Image Source: Matt Jones/BuzzFeed


BY CHARESSE JAMES
Anchor By Logan Tittle


Facebook is looking to revamp the emoticon, but not without some Pixar magic and a little help from Charles Darwin.

The social network has enlisted Pixar story artist Matt Jones and UC Berkeley psychologist Dacher Keltner to try and "crack a universal language" with a set of emoticons “that can express the wide range of nuanced emotions we experience.”  According to The Verge, Jones' experiences from Pixar appear to be “a perfect fit for the job” because the animation studio has long had to convey the emotions of inanimate objects.

The ‘emotional’ early drafts of the idea aims to create emoticons with a little more spark and a little more, well, emotion.

And the team is separating them into detailed emotional categories like ‘high spirits,’ ‘weakness,’ ‘resignation’ and ‘maternal love.’ But it's more than just a redesign, in fact, it’s based in science.

Keltner and Jones are basing their work off of Darwin's The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals which explored Darwin's theory that human and animals have similar emotional expressions. And according to Gizmodo, the two are following the evolutionary theorist’s methods to ensure the new family of emoticons are universal.

“Jones' drawings are being tested on subjects all around the world. And that's in addition to being translated back into the anatomical coding of real facial expressions, allowing them to see if they work on a real human face.”

In addition to making sure this new set of emoticons are actually expressions, Jones and Keltner are experimenting with animation, size and dimensions. But their most immediate problem to solve? What color they should be.

“[Jones] tried ‘Facebook blue,’ thinking it might have become familiar enough to users, but said the emoticons just looked like they had hypothermia. He's experimenting with multiple colors: red for anger, green for envy. ‘But you don't want to offend anyone,’ he explains. ‘Colors will be a racial issue.’”

There's no word on how far along the project is or when it will be completed.

 

Facebook Hires Pixar Artist to Reinvent the Emoticon

by Charesse James
0
Transcript
Feb 10, 2013

Facebook Hires Pixar Artist to Reinvent the Emoticon

Image Source: Matt Jones/BuzzFeed


BY CHARESSE JAMES
Anchor By Logan Tittle


Facebook is looking to revamp the emoticon, but not without some Pixar magic and a little help from Charles Darwin.

The social network has enlisted Pixar story artist Matt Jones and UC Berkeley psychologist Dacher Keltner to try and "crack a universal language" with a set of emoticons “that can express the wide range of nuanced emotions we experience.”  According to The Verge, Jones' experiences from Pixar appear to be “a perfect fit for the job” because the animation studio has long had to convey the emotions of inanimate objects.

The ‘emotional’ early drafts of the idea aims to create emoticons with a little more spark and a little more, well, emotion.

And the team is separating them into detailed emotional categories like ‘high spirits,’ ‘weakness,’ ‘resignation’ and ‘maternal love.’ But it's more than just a redesign, in fact, it’s based in science.

Keltner and Jones are basing their work off of Darwin's The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals which explored Darwin's theory that human and animals have similar emotional expressions. And according to Gizmodo, the two are following the evolutionary theorist’s methods to ensure the new family of emoticons are universal.

“Jones' drawings are being tested on subjects all around the world. And that's in addition to being translated back into the anatomical coding of real facial expressions, allowing them to see if they work on a real human face.”

In addition to making sure this new set of emoticons are actually expressions, Jones and Keltner are experimenting with animation, size and dimensions. But their most immediate problem to solve? What color they should be.

“[Jones] tried ‘Facebook blue,’ thinking it might have become familiar enough to users, but said the emoticons just looked like they had hypothermia. He's experimenting with multiple colors: red for anger, green for envy. ‘But you don't want to offend anyone,’ he explains. ‘Colors will be a racial issue.’”

There's no word on how far along the project is or when it will be completed.

 

View More
Comments
Newsy
www2