(Image source: The New York Times)

 

BY LOGAN TITTLE

 

Facebook is painting a pretty picture for an artist who previously painted its headquarter walls.

 

According to the Daily Mail—35-year-old artist David Choe was asked to paint the social media’s office space back in 2005.  After the job was done he had a choice of how to get paid.  A few thousand dollars cash for his creativity—or a share in Facebook stock. 

 

Christian Science Monitor tells us— “He eventually decided on the stock option, even figured his choice was ‘ridiculous and pointless.’ Fast forward a few years, and Choe is poised to become a multimillionaire.”

 

But he’s not alone. The New York Times reports he and many others who helped out Facebook in those early years will receive between 0.1 to 0.25 percent of the company. Might not sound like much—but it is.

 

“…a stake that size is worth hundreds of millions of dollars, based on a market value of $100 billion. Mr. Choe’s payment is valued at roughly $200 million, according to a number of people who know Mr. Choe and Facebook executives.”

 

Even Facebook is setting itself up for new heights.

 

The Wall Street Journal reports the company’s initial public offering--

 

“…would top rival Google Inc.'s…record for the largest U.S. Internet IPO...raising $1.9 billion…Facebook said it is seeking to raise $5 billion, but that figure is a placeholder and will likely grow.”

 

So when can we expect to see the social site soaring? ABC News says—if all goes as planned, the company will likely be trading publicly in May.

Facebook Artist Makes Millions

by Logan Tittle
0
Transcript
Feb 4, 2012

Facebook Artist Makes Millions

(Image source: The New York Times)

 

BY LOGAN TITTLE

 

Facebook is painting a pretty picture for an artist who previously painted its headquarter walls.

 

According to the Daily Mail—35-year-old artist David Choe was asked to paint the social media’s office space back in 2005.  After the job was done he had a choice of how to get paid.  A few thousand dollars cash for his creativity—or a share in Facebook stock. 

 

Christian Science Monitor tells us— “He eventually decided on the stock option, even figured his choice was ‘ridiculous and pointless.’ Fast forward a few years, and Choe is poised to become a multimillionaire.”

 

But he’s not alone. The New York Times reports he and many others who helped out Facebook in those early years will receive between 0.1 to 0.25 percent of the company. Might not sound like much—but it is.

 

“…a stake that size is worth hundreds of millions of dollars, based on a market value of $100 billion. Mr. Choe’s payment is valued at roughly $200 million, according to a number of people who know Mr. Choe and Facebook executives.”

 

Even Facebook is setting itself up for new heights.

 

The Wall Street Journal reports the company’s initial public offering--

 

“…would top rival Google Inc.'s…record for the largest U.S. Internet IPO...raising $1.9 billion…Facebook said it is seeking to raise $5 billion, but that figure is a placeholder and will likely grow.”

 

So when can we expect to see the social site soaring? ABC News says—if all goes as planned, the company will likely be trading publicly in May.

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