(Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

BY SCOTT MALONE

ANCHOR LOGAN TITTLE


The nightmare week for Boeing and its Dreamliner jet continued Friday following news the Federal Aviation Administration will conduct a comprehensive review of the jet’s critical systems.

Boeing has seen its latest airliner suffer five safety incidents in the last five days, including a battery fire on one jet and another plane that leaked 40 gallons of fuel on the tarmac at Boston’s Logan International Airport. Other Dreamliners have had issues with cracked windshields, and a spotty brake light. (Via WHDH)

But WFXT spoke with officials at Logan Airport who say these issues can happen to any plane - not just the 787.

“You know this has happened with other type aircraft, it’s not a common thing, but it has happened before. It’s not just specific to a 787.”

CNN spoke with several aviation experts who say these problems are just some typical growing pains that come after a brand new line of jets are cleared for takeoff.

“They’ve defended the aircraft. They say these problems that we’re seeing is not out of the range of the problems that they expected for a new aircraft.”

But the president of Boeing says the plane “completed the most rigorous certification process in history” before it was delivered - a process that included more than 200,000 hours of safety checks. (Via USA Today)

So how does the plane have this many issues after 200,000 hours of safety checks? A writer for NBC News says this is the first brand new aircraft to enter service in some time, and it uses parts that haven’t been used in the past.

“The new 787 Dreamliner … relies much more heavily on electric components than previous airplane models … [and] is made largely from lighter composite materials instead of aluminum, which is one reason it promises to be more fuel-efficient than comparable aircraft flying today.”

The FAA says it does not plan on grounding the aircraft, and also does not have a timetable on the length of the investigation.

FAA Investigating Safety of Boeing 787 Dreamliner

by Scott Malone
0
Transcript
Jan 11, 2013

FAA Investigating Safety of Boeing 787 Dreamliner

 

(Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

BY SCOTT MALONE

ANCHOR LOGAN TITTLE


The nightmare week for Boeing and its Dreamliner jet continued Friday following news the Federal Aviation Administration will conduct a comprehensive review of the jet’s critical systems.

Boeing has seen its latest airliner suffer five safety incidents in the last five days, including a battery fire on one jet and another plane that leaked 40 gallons of fuel on the tarmac at Boston’s Logan International Airport. Other Dreamliners have had issues with cracked windshields, and a spotty brake light. (Via WHDH)

But WFXT spoke with officials at Logan Airport who say these issues can happen to any plane - not just the 787.

“You know this has happened with other type aircraft, it’s not a common thing, but it has happened before. It’s not just specific to a 787.”

CNN spoke with several aviation experts who say these problems are just some typical growing pains that come after a brand new line of jets are cleared for takeoff.

“They’ve defended the aircraft. They say these problems that we’re seeing is not out of the range of the problems that they expected for a new aircraft.”

But the president of Boeing says the plane “completed the most rigorous certification process in history” before it was delivered - a process that included more than 200,000 hours of safety checks. (Via USA Today)

So how does the plane have this many issues after 200,000 hours of safety checks? A writer for NBC News says this is the first brand new aircraft to enter service in some time, and it uses parts that haven’t been used in the past.

“The new 787 Dreamliner … relies much more heavily on electric components than previous airplane models … [and] is made largely from lighter composite materials instead of aluminum, which is one reason it promises to be more fuel-efficient than comparable aircraft flying today.”

The FAA says it does not plan on grounding the aircraft, and also does not have a timetable on the length of the investigation.

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