(Thumbnail image: The Sydney Morning Herald)

 

A new study from the health journal Pediatrics suggests 40 percent of children have sex before their parents ever even talk to them about it. The age when kids initiate sexual behavior is increasingly younger and talking about "the talk" is sparking squeamish discussion in the media.

Let’s start with CNN, who brings us Planned Parenthood’s take on the common misconceptions parents face when confronting difficult issues with their kids.

“There’s a myth out there that somehow if you talk to young people about sex they’re going to become sexually active and actually, the opposite is true. It means, frankly, young people are less likely to engage in sexual activity early, and when they do, much more likely to use birth control or use some kind of protection.

 

On a Personal Life Media talk show, Dr. Ron Levine explains why hearing it from parents first better protects their kids from STDs and unwanted pregnancies.

“Us talking to them about it takes away the taboo. Second, us talking to them about it means in order to find out what they're curious about they don't have to experiment to get the answers. They can just come ask us.”

The editor-in-chief of Seventeen Magazine said her readers don’t want to hear specifics when talking with parents about “the birds and the bees.”

“The girls are saying, they don’t want just the nuts and bolts about sex, they want to know about the emotional side.  In fact, when mothers talk about the emotional side, it’s more likely to resonate, girls are more likely to say, ‘Oh yeah, that was helpful.'” (ABC News)

 

An article from conservative magazine Focus on the Family suggests talking might not be necessary, reminding parents that actions can speak louder than words.

“In the teenage years, modeling godly sexuality will outweigh teaching. Teens learn the most by observing parents dress modestly, interact with the opposite sex in a holy way and respect sexuality and sexual content in their speech. Time spent with teens will pay huge dividends in keeping lines of communication open and trust high.”

A sex therapist disagrees on ABC, telling parents to not just talk but to talk often.

“If we were trying to teach a child not to cross the street in the middle of traffic, we wouldn’t just tell them once because it’s so important. We’d want to make sure that was reinforced, reinforced, reinforced, and that’s the same thing.  The fact is, something really important to know isn’t just a one-time deal.”

So what do you think? Is it ever too early for parents to talk about sex with their kids?

 

Writer: Lauren Styler
Produce: Lauren Styler

Experts Want Parents to Give Sex Talk Earlier

by Nathan Giannini
0
Transcript
Dec 9, 2009

Experts Want Parents to Give Sex Talk Earlier

(Thumbnail image: The Sydney Morning Herald)

 

A new study from the health journal Pediatrics suggests 40 percent of children have sex before their parents ever even talk to them about it. The age when kids initiate sexual behavior is increasingly younger and talking about "the talk" is sparking squeamish discussion in the media.

Let’s start with CNN, who brings us Planned Parenthood’s take on the common misconceptions parents face when confronting difficult issues with their kids.

“There’s a myth out there that somehow if you talk to young people about sex they’re going to become sexually active and actually, the opposite is true. It means, frankly, young people are less likely to engage in sexual activity early, and when they do, much more likely to use birth control or use some kind of protection.

 

On a Personal Life Media talk show, Dr. Ron Levine explains why hearing it from parents first better protects their kids from STDs and unwanted pregnancies.

“Us talking to them about it takes away the taboo. Second, us talking to them about it means in order to find out what they're curious about they don't have to experiment to get the answers. They can just come ask us.”

The editor-in-chief of Seventeen Magazine said her readers don’t want to hear specifics when talking with parents about “the birds and the bees.”

“The girls are saying, they don’t want just the nuts and bolts about sex, they want to know about the emotional side.  In fact, when mothers talk about the emotional side, it’s more likely to resonate, girls are more likely to say, ‘Oh yeah, that was helpful.'” (ABC News)

 

An article from conservative magazine Focus on the Family suggests talking might not be necessary, reminding parents that actions can speak louder than words.

“In the teenage years, modeling godly sexuality will outweigh teaching. Teens learn the most by observing parents dress modestly, interact with the opposite sex in a holy way and respect sexuality and sexual content in their speech. Time spent with teens will pay huge dividends in keeping lines of communication open and trust high.”

A sex therapist disagrees on ABC, telling parents to not just talk but to talk often.

“If we were trying to teach a child not to cross the street in the middle of traffic, we wouldn’t just tell them once because it’s so important. We’d want to make sure that was reinforced, reinforced, reinforced, and that’s the same thing.  The fact is, something really important to know isn’t just a one-time deal.”

So what do you think? Is it ever too early for parents to talk about sex with their kids?

 

Writer: Lauren Styler
Produce: Lauren Styler

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