(Image source: Androidguys)
 

BY EVAN THOMAS

ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN

Google is on a roll. The European Commission and the U.S. Department of Justice have closed their antitrust investigations into Google’s acquisition of Motorola Mobility and cleared the way forward for the search giant.

The leading theory is that Google is buying Motorola for its hoard of some 17,000 hardware patents. In a statement released Monday, the Department of Justice said the acquisition was “unlikely to substantially lessen competition” in the marketplace.

That’s two big hurdles down, but Google still needs to hear from some other voices around the world.  TechCrunch reports.

“With this, Google is one step closer to closing the deal, although they’re still waiting on approval from China, Taiwan, and Israel before the transaction can officially be completed.”

But that doesn’t mean Google’s off the hook stateside. Ars Technica says the Department of Justice is going to be keeping a very close eye on the search giant.

“It almost sounds as though antitrust officials wanted to disapprove the Google/Motorola buy, but couldn't find compelling enough grounds to do so. Instead, Justice reserved a few choice words for Google, saying the company has not made sufficient promises to license essential patents in fair, reasonable, and non-discriminatory terms.”

Even with Motorola’s know-how, Google is going up against entrenched hardware powerhouses Apple and Samsung. ReadWriteWeb says Google is competing where it can -- with software.

“Google's $12.5 billion acquisition of Motorola should not affect the ecosystem at large, considering that Apple and Samsung own 95% of mobile phone profits worldwide. [CEO Larry Page] may see Apple's profits and want to get in on the device game but the idea is to use Motorola to protect Android.”

But maybe handset profits aren’t the point. The Los Angeles Times quotes analyst Colin Gillis, who says Google might be okay marketing tech at a loss.

“‘Google is about to chase a whole new business model. It’s going to get hardware out to consumers at low to no cost and make it up in services, because the only way to beat Apple is on price.’”

That’s certainly backed up by Google’s other hardware activities. The San Jose Mercury News reported last weekend Google is planning to construct high-end lab facilities for optics and radio testing on its Mountain View campus.

 

EU, U.S. Regulators Clear Google’s Motorola Acquisition

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Feb 14, 2012

EU, U.S. Regulators Clear Google’s Motorola Acquisition

(Image source: Androidguys)
 

BY EVAN THOMAS

ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN

Google is on a roll. The European Commission and the U.S. Department of Justice have closed their antitrust investigations into Google’s acquisition of Motorola Mobility and cleared the way forward for the search giant.

The leading theory is that Google is buying Motorola for its hoard of some 17,000 hardware patents. In a statement released Monday, the Department of Justice said the acquisition was “unlikely to substantially lessen competition” in the marketplace.

That’s two big hurdles down, but Google still needs to hear from some other voices around the world.  TechCrunch reports.

“With this, Google is one step closer to closing the deal, although they’re still waiting on approval from China, Taiwan, and Israel before the transaction can officially be completed.”

But that doesn’t mean Google’s off the hook stateside. Ars Technica says the Department of Justice is going to be keeping a very close eye on the search giant.

“It almost sounds as though antitrust officials wanted to disapprove the Google/Motorola buy, but couldn't find compelling enough grounds to do so. Instead, Justice reserved a few choice words for Google, saying the company has not made sufficient promises to license essential patents in fair, reasonable, and non-discriminatory terms.”

Even with Motorola’s know-how, Google is going up against entrenched hardware powerhouses Apple and Samsung. ReadWriteWeb says Google is competing where it can -- with software.

“Google's $12.5 billion acquisition of Motorola should not affect the ecosystem at large, considering that Apple and Samsung own 95% of mobile phone profits worldwide. [CEO Larry Page] may see Apple's profits and want to get in on the device game but the idea is to use Motorola to protect Android.”

But maybe handset profits aren’t the point. The Los Angeles Times quotes analyst Colin Gillis, who says Google might be okay marketing tech at a loss.

“‘Google is about to chase a whole new business model. It’s going to get hardware out to consumers at low to no cost and make it up in services, because the only way to beat Apple is on price.’”

That’s certainly backed up by Google’s other hardware activities. The San Jose Mercury News reported last weekend Google is planning to construct high-end lab facilities for optics and radio testing on its Mountain View campus.

 

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