(Image Source: JimRomanesko.com)

BY ZACH TOOMBS

ANCHOR: NATHAN BYRNE 

From Linsational to Linsanity, media outlets have had plenty of fun coming up with new puns in their coverage of rookie New York Knicks star Jeremy Lin. But one such attempt at a witty headline has ESPN in hot water.

The first post on ESPN’s mobile site Friday night read “Chink in the Armor.” The story covered the Knicks’ first loss in seven games with their newfound phenom Lin. Now this headline is making headlines.

The post was changed after about 45 minutes, but many took notice — including a writer for SB Nation.

“I actually can’t believe this happened. Of all the dumb things to think up when adding a headline to a story about Jeremy Lin, ‘Chink In The Armor’ may just be the dumbest. And how does the person writing the headline not pause to think ‘Hey, we’re running this headline that contains a derogatory term for Asians along with a giant picture of Jeremy Lin?’ It’s not edgy or funny; it’s a ridiculously terrible mistake.”

This isn’t the first time ESPN has used this phrase in reference to Jeremy Lin. An ESPN anchor used it — perhaps unwittingly — earlier this week.

“He’s handled everything very well, as you said — unflappable. But if there is a chink in the armor, where can Lin improve his game?

ESPN responded to criticism Saturday, posting this statement online:

“We are conducting a complete review of our cross-platform editorial procedures and are determining appropriate disciplinary action to ensure this does not happen again. We regret and apologize for this mistake.”

Although the inappropriate headline might have been unintentional, a writer for Forbes finds that hard to believe.

“As anyone who has worked in digital media knows, the headline is what draws attention and hits... Unlike an on-air comment, most writers and editors obsess over the headline even after they click the publish button. So my sense of things is that whoever posted the headline thought about it, giggled, and clicked publish.”
 

ESPN Gets Backlash for Racially Charged Lin Headline

by Zach Toombs
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Feb 18, 2012

ESPN Gets Backlash for Racially Charged Lin Headline

 

(Image Source: JimRomanesko.com)

BY ZACH TOOMBS

ANCHOR: NATHAN BYRNE 

From Linsational to Linsanity, media outlets have had plenty of fun coming up with new puns in their coverage of rookie New York Knicks star Jeremy Lin. But one such attempt at a witty headline has ESPN in hot water.

The first post on ESPN’s mobile site Friday night read “Chink in the Armor.” The story covered the Knicks’ first loss in seven games with their newfound phenom Lin. Now this headline is making headlines.

The post was changed after about 45 minutes, but many took notice — including a writer for SB Nation.

“I actually can’t believe this happened. Of all the dumb things to think up when adding a headline to a story about Jeremy Lin, ‘Chink In The Armor’ may just be the dumbest. And how does the person writing the headline not pause to think ‘Hey, we’re running this headline that contains a derogatory term for Asians along with a giant picture of Jeremy Lin?’ It’s not edgy or funny; it’s a ridiculously terrible mistake.”

This isn’t the first time ESPN has used this phrase in reference to Jeremy Lin. An ESPN anchor used it — perhaps unwittingly — earlier this week.

“He’s handled everything very well, as you said — unflappable. But if there is a chink in the armor, where can Lin improve his game?

ESPN responded to criticism Saturday, posting this statement online:

“We are conducting a complete review of our cross-platform editorial procedures and are determining appropriate disciplinary action to ensure this does not happen again. We regret and apologize for this mistake.”

Although the inappropriate headline might have been unintentional, a writer for Forbes finds that hard to believe.

“As anyone who has worked in digital media knows, the headline is what draws attention and hits... Unlike an on-air comment, most writers and editors obsess over the headline even after they click the publish button. So my sense of things is that whoever posted the headline thought about it, giggled, and clicked publish.”
 

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