(Thumbnail Image: The Telegraph)

 

Former U.N. nuclear inspector Mohammed ElBaradei could be considering a run for president of Egypt in 2011. And though he hasn't formally announced it yet--he's already attracted a significant following among the country's youth.

"As an Egyptian, when I hear so many of the Egyptian people asking me, in fact insisting, that I participate politically, I have to say yes. I was born an Egypitan, I've lived as an Egyptian, I will die an Egyptian." (Al Jazeera English)

We're looking at coverage from France 24, Al Jazeera English, The New York Times and Newsweek.

Despite displays of outward support, ElBaradei faces an uphill battle to become a legal candidate under Egyptian law. France 24 explains.

"But observers think his political prospects are dim given the conditions imposed on candidates by the Egyptian constitution. It requires a presidential candidate be head of political party for at least a year, but the elections are only 18 months away.  If he ran as an independent, he would need the support of 250 elected officials in a country dominated by Hosni Mubarak's National Democratic Party."

 

One member of the National Democratic Party, which currently controls Egypt, tells Al Jazeera English that the constitution is more important than one man's candidacy.

"Because this constitution is not set by the government. It is approved by the majority of the people. This is the highest law in the land, so it is not amended by a wish of a citizen.  It's amended by the wish of the majority of people. I would rather that he should work within the existing and manipulate the existing situation rather than criticizing it."

A professor for American University at Cairo tells The New York Times ElBaradei's potential candidacy is less important than his popularity, something the incumbent president can't afford to ignore.

“ElBaradei constitutes a real challenge, not necessarily in terms of his capacity to win an election ... but in terms of the superiority of his prestige and the respect he has domestically and internationally.”

 

But one writer for Newsweek is skeptical of ElBaradei's chances, and even more critical of the effect he might have on opposition coalitions in Egypt.

"If he really makes a run, not only will he lose, but he would fracture the fragile coalition of Mubarak's opponents, leaving them weaker and more demoralized than ever... If ElBaradei wants what's good for the opposition, he should get out of the way."

ElBaradei has stated he will not seek election without considerable reform of candidacy laws, court oversight of the election process, and international overseers.

 

Writer: Tracy Pfeiffer

Producer: Newsy Staff

ElBaradei Signals Run for Egypt Presidency

by Charlie McKeague
0
Transcript
Mar 2, 2010

ElBaradei Signals Run for Egypt Presidency

(Thumbnail Image: The Telegraph)

 

Former U.N. nuclear inspector Mohammed ElBaradei could be considering a run for president of Egypt in 2011. And though he hasn't formally announced it yet--he's already attracted a significant following among the country's youth.

"As an Egyptian, when I hear so many of the Egyptian people asking me, in fact insisting, that I participate politically, I have to say yes. I was born an Egypitan, I've lived as an Egyptian, I will die an Egyptian." (Al Jazeera English)

We're looking at coverage from France 24, Al Jazeera English, The New York Times and Newsweek.

Despite displays of outward support, ElBaradei faces an uphill battle to become a legal candidate under Egyptian law. France 24 explains.

"But observers think his political prospects are dim given the conditions imposed on candidates by the Egyptian constitution. It requires a presidential candidate be head of political party for at least a year, but the elections are only 18 months away.  If he ran as an independent, he would need the support of 250 elected officials in a country dominated by Hosni Mubarak's National Democratic Party."

 

One member of the National Democratic Party, which currently controls Egypt, tells Al Jazeera English that the constitution is more important than one man's candidacy.

"Because this constitution is not set by the government. It is approved by the majority of the people. This is the highest law in the land, so it is not amended by a wish of a citizen.  It's amended by the wish of the majority of people. I would rather that he should work within the existing and manipulate the existing situation rather than criticizing it."

A professor for American University at Cairo tells The New York Times ElBaradei's potential candidacy is less important than his popularity, something the incumbent president can't afford to ignore.

“ElBaradei constitutes a real challenge, not necessarily in terms of his capacity to win an election ... but in terms of the superiority of his prestige and the respect he has domestically and internationally.”

 

But one writer for Newsweek is skeptical of ElBaradei's chances, and even more critical of the effect he might have on opposition coalitions in Egypt.

"If he really makes a run, not only will he lose, but he would fracture the fragile coalition of Mubarak's opponents, leaving them weaker and more demoralized than ever... If ElBaradei wants what's good for the opposition, he should get out of the way."

ElBaradei has stated he will not seek election without considerable reform of candidacy laws, court oversight of the election process, and international overseers.

 

Writer: Tracy Pfeiffer

Producer: Newsy Staff

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