(Image Source: The New York Times)

BY GEORGE DUMONTIER

ANCHOR JASMINE BAILEY

Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi gave the military power to maintain security and arrest civilians until the referendum vote Saturday. A correspondent for Fox News says this military force brings up concern that history could repeat itself.

“This so called temporary security measure of course revives memories of a former security measure that was put in place by former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak”

The new military movement is a response to the opposition’s protests to push back the election and rewrite the constitution. The opposition argues the current draft will further divide the nation. The New York Times reports.

“Although international experts who have studied the draft say it is hardly more religious than Egypt’s old constitution, opponents say it fails to adequately protect individual rights from being constricted by a future Islamist majority in Parliament.”

The BBC points out that Morsi is compromising a little bit, but it won’t be enough.

“The government did announce one concession - the lifting of the decree granting President Morsi sweeping powers. The opposition quickly rejected that as not enough to break the deadlock.”

TIME predicts Morsi’s version of the constitution will pass, but it may cost him some support in future elections.

“... [He] managed to alienate some of his own voters. Many of those protesting against Morsi and calling for his downfall said they voted for him over the summer — viewing him as the lesser of two evils”

Protests are expected to continue at the presidential palace until the election.

Egyptian President Grants Arrest Power to Military

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Dec 10, 2012

Egyptian President Grants Arrest Power to Military

(Image Source: The New York Times)

BY GEORGE DUMONTIER

ANCHOR JASMINE BAILEY

Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi gave the military power to maintain security and arrest civilians until the referendum vote Saturday. A correspondent for Fox News says this military force brings up concern that history could repeat itself.

“This so called temporary security measure of course revives memories of a former security measure that was put in place by former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak”

The new military movement is a response to the opposition’s protests to push back the election and rewrite the constitution. The opposition argues the current draft will further divide the nation. The New York Times reports.

“Although international experts who have studied the draft say it is hardly more religious than Egypt’s old constitution, opponents say it fails to adequately protect individual rights from being constricted by a future Islamist majority in Parliament.”

The BBC points out that Morsi is compromising a little bit, but it won’t be enough.

“The government did announce one concession - the lifting of the decree granting President Morsi sweeping powers. The opposition quickly rejected that as not enough to break the deadlock.”

TIME predicts Morsi’s version of the constitution will pass, but it may cost him some support in future elections.

“... [He] managed to alienate some of his own voters. Many of those protesting against Morsi and calling for his downfall said they voted for him over the summer — viewing him as the lesser of two evils”

Protests are expected to continue at the presidential palace until the election.

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