(Image Source: Bikyamasr )

 

BY DAN KENNEDY

ANCHOR JASMINE BAILEY

 

Some newspapers and television stations are temporarily shutting down as members of the Egyptian media join the strike against President Mohamed Morsi and his new draft constitution. Here’s WNDU.

“Morsi also faces the prospect of wider civil disobedience as media, the tourism industry and law professors pondered joining an indefinite strike by the nation's judges...there are now calls for a second revolution.”

Eleven newspapers engaged in the protest by printing this picture of the press behind bars with the headline “No to Dictatorship,” while others didn’t print anything at all.

OutlookIndia reports three privately-owned television stations will go off the air Wednesday in the first judicial and media strike since 1919.

CNN writes, “Article 48 of the draft constitution ties media freedom to the framework of society and national security, which many Egyptian journalists see as vague terminology.”
KSAT has more on the dilemma.

“Morsi’s government is facing the possibility of several other strikes after making controversial changes to the constitution. Many groups feel that the change could lead to a dictatorship.”

Activists are worried that if approved, the new constitution would push the country towards Islamist rule.

According to Bikyamasr, the draft doesn’t prohibit child trafficking and child labor.
The website also claims the draft constitution doesn’t shield minors from early marriage.

President Morsi’s draft constitution goes to public referendum December 15.

Egyptian Media Join Protest Against President Morsi

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Dec 4, 2012

Egyptian Media Join Protest Against President Morsi

(Image Source: Bikyamasr )

 

BY DAN KENNEDY

ANCHOR JASMINE BAILEY

 

Some newspapers and television stations are temporarily shutting down as members of the Egyptian media join the strike against President Mohamed Morsi and his new draft constitution. Here’s WNDU.

“Morsi also faces the prospect of wider civil disobedience as media, the tourism industry and law professors pondered joining an indefinite strike by the nation's judges...there are now calls for a second revolution.”

Eleven newspapers engaged in the protest by printing this picture of the press behind bars with the headline “No to Dictatorship,” while others didn’t print anything at all.

OutlookIndia reports three privately-owned television stations will go off the air Wednesday in the first judicial and media strike since 1919.

CNN writes, “Article 48 of the draft constitution ties media freedom to the framework of society and national security, which many Egyptian journalists see as vague terminology.”
KSAT has more on the dilemma.

“Morsi’s government is facing the possibility of several other strikes after making controversial changes to the constitution. Many groups feel that the change could lead to a dictatorship.”

Activists are worried that if approved, the new constitution would push the country towards Islamist rule.

According to Bikyamasr, the draft doesn’t prohibit child trafficking and child labor.
The website also claims the draft constitution doesn’t shield minors from early marriage.

President Morsi’s draft constitution goes to public referendum December 15.

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