(Image Source: AlMasryClub.com)


 

BY HARUMENDHAH HELMY
ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS
 

 

Clashes in Port Said, Egypt, have left a 13-year-old boy dead and dozens others injured. This, after the Egyptian Football Association ruled against the city’s local club in response to an earlier deadly riot at the club’s home pitch — the worst stadium disaster in Egypt’s history.

 

Here’s the BBC with a recap.

 

“For hours, the supporters of Al-Masry football team had battled with police and soldiers in Port Said, furious that their club had been for two seasons, its stadium closed for three years.”

 

This February 1, 2012 riot led to the ban. At least 74 people were killed and more than a thousand injured. Despite winning the match, Al-Masry supporters reportedly attacked longtime rival team Al-Ahly’s fans with knives, swords, clubs and stones. (Video: The Telegraph)
 

An article from Eurasia Review says Port Said is known to be particularly intense in its love for soccer.  
 

“All cities and towns in Egypt are, to some extent, football-mad: but Port Said is a city which takes its football fervour to the extreme. Boys learn to dribble from the time they can walk, and street football games are played out as passionately as the city’s sole professional football club is supported.”
 

Despite the strong reactions to the ban from local Port Said fans, Ahram Online reports the rival Al-Ahly team members are saying this punishment is too lenient, considering...
 

“Ahly players were traumatised by the catastrophe, especially that they witnessed as some of their fans died and were injured in their dressing room.”
 

And as Al Jazeera suggests — the repeated riots seem to be an ongoing test for the Egyptian government.
 

“Many people blame the Egyptian government for failing to protect fans during the game. As Egypt attempts to move towards a democratic future, its stability and security in the streets, as well as in the football pitch will also be at the foreground of people’s minds.”
 

Some Egyptians also still say February’s riots were the work of paid thugs. The Port Said harbor remained closed Saturday, while ships using the Suez Canal were redirected to a secondary route.

 

Egypt Soccer Ban Leads to More Clashes

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Mar 25, 2012

Egypt Soccer Ban Leads to More Clashes

(Image Source: AlMasryClub.com)


 

BY HARUMENDHAH HELMY
ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS
 

 

Clashes in Port Said, Egypt, have left a 13-year-old boy dead and dozens others injured. This, after the Egyptian Football Association ruled against the city’s local club in response to an earlier deadly riot at the club’s home pitch — the worst stadium disaster in Egypt’s history.

 

Here’s the BBC with a recap.

 

“For hours, the supporters of Al-Masry football team had battled with police and soldiers in Port Said, furious that their club had been for two seasons, its stadium closed for three years.”

 

This February 1, 2012 riot led to the ban. At least 74 people were killed and more than a thousand injured. Despite winning the match, Al-Masry supporters reportedly attacked longtime rival team Al-Ahly’s fans with knives, swords, clubs and stones. (Video: The Telegraph)
 

An article from Eurasia Review says Port Said is known to be particularly intense in its love for soccer.  
 

“All cities and towns in Egypt are, to some extent, football-mad: but Port Said is a city which takes its football fervour to the extreme. Boys learn to dribble from the time they can walk, and street football games are played out as passionately as the city’s sole professional football club is supported.”
 

Despite the strong reactions to the ban from local Port Said fans, Ahram Online reports the rival Al-Ahly team members are saying this punishment is too lenient, considering...
 

“Ahly players were traumatised by the catastrophe, especially that they witnessed as some of their fans died and were injured in their dressing room.”
 

And as Al Jazeera suggests — the repeated riots seem to be an ongoing test for the Egyptian government.
 

“Many people blame the Egyptian government for failing to protect fans during the game. As Egypt attempts to move towards a democratic future, its stability and security in the streets, as well as in the football pitch will also be at the foreground of people’s minds.”
 

Some Egyptians also still say February’s riots were the work of paid thugs. The Port Said harbor remained closed Saturday, while ships using the Suez Canal were redirected to a secondary route.

 

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