(Image source: Wikimedia Commons)

 

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS

ANCHOR CHRISTIAN BRYANT

 

 

Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi has reversed his decision to place himself above judicial review, but a referendum to implement a controversial new constitution remains set for December 15.

 

Seven protesters have died and many more were injured in clashes with authorities since Morsi issued his decree last month. Political opponents said Morsi was attempting a power grab, trying to become a modern-day pharaoh in a nation that just toppled an unelected leader last year. [Video: BBC

 

The Washington Post reports: 

 

"The compromise was reached at a meeting Saturday that Morsi had billed as a national dialogue but that was boycotted by all but a handful of opposition figures who had earlier said that if the referendum was going ahead, there was nothing to talk about."

 

The fact that that referendum is still scheduled means Morsi’s critics aren’t entirely pleased. But Al Jazeera’s Sherine Tadros says this is a very clever political move for the Egyptian president as he tries to pass a new constitution next week.

 

“It puts the ball really in the court of the opposition and allows the president to go ‘Well, I’ve met you halfway here.’ … It will go a long way to placate the judiciary, who have been a problem in all of this because they are the ones who have to supervise a referendum.”

 

Morsi’s political allies in the Muslim Brotherhood crafted the new constitution at the subject of that referendum. Human rights advocates have expressed concerns about the latest draft. A spokesman for the United Nations High Commissioner told Voice of America, they’re worried about...

 

“...the absence in the current draft of any reference to the international human rights treaties, which Egypt has ratified, and is bound to uphold.  (Egypt’s) 1971 Constitution, by contrast, stipulated the legal standing of these treaties.”

 

And despite the step back from the most controversial parts of his decree, Morsi remained highly guarded in case of further protests Sunday — with a heavy military presence around the presidential palace. [Video: Sky News]

Egypt’s Morsi Backs Down from Controversial Decree

by Zach Toombs
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Transcript
Dec 8, 2012

Egypt’s Morsi Backs Down from Controversial Decree

 

(Image source: Wikimedia Commons)

 

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS

ANCHOR CHRISTIAN BRYANT

 

 

Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi has reversed his decision to place himself above judicial review, but a referendum to implement a controversial new constitution remains set for December 15.

 

Seven protesters have died and many more were injured in clashes with authorities since Morsi issued his decree last month. Political opponents said Morsi was attempting a power grab, trying to become a modern-day pharaoh in a nation that just toppled an unelected leader last year. [Video: BBC

 

The Washington Post reports: 

 

"The compromise was reached at a meeting Saturday that Morsi had billed as a national dialogue but that was boycotted by all but a handful of opposition figures who had earlier said that if the referendum was going ahead, there was nothing to talk about."

 

The fact that that referendum is still scheduled means Morsi’s critics aren’t entirely pleased. But Al Jazeera’s Sherine Tadros says this is a very clever political move for the Egyptian president as he tries to pass a new constitution next week.

 

“It puts the ball really in the court of the opposition and allows the president to go ‘Well, I’ve met you halfway here.’ … It will go a long way to placate the judiciary, who have been a problem in all of this because they are the ones who have to supervise a referendum.”

 

Morsi’s political allies in the Muslim Brotherhood crafted the new constitution at the subject of that referendum. Human rights advocates have expressed concerns about the latest draft. A spokesman for the United Nations High Commissioner told Voice of America, they’re worried about...

 

“...the absence in the current draft of any reference to the international human rights treaties, which Egypt has ratified, and is bound to uphold.  (Egypt’s) 1971 Constitution, by contrast, stipulated the legal standing of these treaties.”

 

And despite the step back from the most controversial parts of his decree, Morsi remained highly guarded in case of further protests Sunday — with a heavy military presence around the presidential palace. [Video: Sky News]

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