(Image Source: Al Jazeera)

BY JOHN O’CONNOR

ANCHOR JASMINE BAILEY

Polling stations opened across Egypt Saturday for what will be the final round of voting on a controversial new constitution. Sky News has more.

“The divisive Islamic backed constitution is likely to be approved although opposition groups say it will limit religious freedoms and women’s rights.”  

According to CNN, “More than 6,700 polling stations in 17 provinces opened their doors in the morning to nearly 26 million potential voters.” Results from the first round of voting last week “produced an unofficial result of 56.6% in favor of the national charter … ” 

A BBC correspondent in Giza says the referendum had to be spread over two weekends because …

“ … a number of the judges boycotted it. They said they weren’t in favor of this constitution and the judges of the people who normally oversee elections here.” 

According to the Guardian, opponents of Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi — “liberals, leftists, and secular Egyptians” — oppose the current draft constitution which they say favors Islamists and limits certain freedoms. Including freedom of religion and expression, as well as the rights of women and children. 

Businessweek reports on the eve of Saturday’s vote, Islamists in support of President Morsi and the opposition clashed in Egypt’s Mediterranean city, Alexandria …   

“ … leaving dozens wounded, in the latest reflection of discontent over both the charter and what secularists and minority Christians say is the growing hold of Islamists on power.” 

The leader of an opposition group in Egypt tells Al Jazeera the clash on Friday night is a clear sign that this Islamic-based referendum will not work for the stability of the country.

“Anger and frustration is everywhere. You can expect to see a lot of this stuff going on everyday because the [constitution] doesn’t deal with the vulnerabilities, it doesn’t protect everyone. We didn’t include everyone in this [drafting] process.”  

According to Reuters, unofficial tallies for the referendum are expected to be released just hours after polling stations close, but the official result might not be declared until Monday. 

Egypt Holds Final Round of Voting on Divisive Constitution

by John O'Connor
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Transcript
Dec 22, 2012

Egypt Holds Final Round of Voting on Divisive Constitution

 

(Image Source: Al Jazeera)

BY JOHN O’CONNOR

ANCHOR JASMINE BAILEY

Polling stations opened across Egypt Saturday for what will be the final round of voting on a controversial new constitution. Sky News has more.

“The divisive Islamic backed constitution is likely to be approved although opposition groups say it will limit religious freedoms and women’s rights.”  

According to CNN, “More than 6,700 polling stations in 17 provinces opened their doors in the morning to nearly 26 million potential voters.” Results from the first round of voting last week “produced an unofficial result of 56.6% in favor of the national charter … ” 

A BBC correspondent in Giza says the referendum had to be spread over two weekends because …

“ … a number of the judges boycotted it. They said they weren’t in favor of this constitution and the judges of the people who normally oversee elections here.” 

According to the Guardian, opponents of Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi — “liberals, leftists, and secular Egyptians” — oppose the current draft constitution which they say favors Islamists and limits certain freedoms. Including freedom of religion and expression, as well as the rights of women and children. 

Businessweek reports on the eve of Saturday’s vote, Islamists in support of President Morsi and the opposition clashed in Egypt’s Mediterranean city, Alexandria …   

“ … leaving dozens wounded, in the latest reflection of discontent over both the charter and what secularists and minority Christians say is the growing hold of Islamists on power.” 

The leader of an opposition group in Egypt tells Al Jazeera the clash on Friday night is a clear sign that this Islamic-based referendum will not work for the stability of the country.

“Anger and frustration is everywhere. You can expect to see a lot of this stuff going on everyday because the [constitution] doesn’t deal with the vulnerabilities, it doesn’t protect everyone. We didn’t include everyone in this [drafting] process.”  

According to Reuters, unofficial tallies for the referendum are expected to be released just hours after polling stations close, but the official result might not be declared until Monday. 

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