(Image source: CBC News/ Jayne Wilkins)

BY ANNA BURKART

ANCHOR JEREMY TRUITT


A University of Toronto-led team of scientists has discovered that early humans hunted with stone-tipped spears for longer than we’ve been--well--human. KSL News Radio reports:

“Neanderthals and Homo sapiens may not come up with the first spears but a shared ancestor called and I hope I get this right, Homo heidelbergensis.”

The new study is based on discovered stone points in South Africa that are half a million years old — meaning these weapons were in use 200,000 years earlier than previously estimated.

An anthropologist told National Geographic it “is ‘like finding an iPod in a Roman Empire site … It's that level of weirdness.’”

According to The Guardian, these stone-tipped spears indicated a significant tipping point in evolution,“allowing our ancestors to kill animals more efficiently and have more regular access to meat, which they would have needed to feed ever-
growing brains.

This finding is just the most recent revelation that human technology dates back further than ever thought before.


According to Scientific American, “These new findings follow on the heels of last week’s revelation that bow-and-arrow technology is older than previously thought and add to a growing body of evidence that, on the whole, our long-ago predecessors were more innovative than they are often given credit for.”

Early Hunters Invented Stone-Tipped Spears 500,000 Years Ago

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Nov 16, 2012

Early Hunters Invented Stone-Tipped Spears 500,000 Years Ago

(Image source: CBC News/ Jayne Wilkins)

BY ANNA BURKART

ANCHOR JEREMY TRUITT


A University of Toronto-led team of scientists has discovered that early humans hunted with stone-tipped spears for longer than we’ve been--well--human. KSL News Radio reports:

“Neanderthals and Homo sapiens may not come up with the first spears but a shared ancestor called and I hope I get this right, Homo heidelbergensis.”

The new study is based on discovered stone points in South Africa that are half a million years old — meaning these weapons were in use 200,000 years earlier than previously estimated.

An anthropologist told National Geographic it “is ‘like finding an iPod in a Roman Empire site … It's that level of weirdness.’”

According to The Guardian, these stone-tipped spears indicated a significant tipping point in evolution,“allowing our ancestors to kill animals more efficiently and have more regular access to meat, which they would have needed to feed ever-
growing brains.

This finding is just the most recent revelation that human technology dates back further than ever thought before.


According to Scientific American, “These new findings follow on the heels of last week’s revelation that bow-and-arrow technology is older than previously thought and add to a growing body of evidence that, on the whole, our long-ago predecessors were more innovative than they are often given credit for.”

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