Dunkin' Donuts Apologizes After Worker Turns Away Officer

A Dunkin' Donuts employee in Connecticut is making headlines after telling a police officer, "We don't serve cops here."
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Dunkin' Donuts Apologizes After Worker Turns Away Officer

A Dunkin' Donuts employee was forced to apologize after refusing service to a police officer. (Video via Dunkin' Donuts

"Especially in this community where we actually have the support of most of the people in this community, that's actually a very surprising thing to happen," an officer told WTIC

It happened Saturday morning in West Hartford, Connecticut. According to police, the officer was waiting to buy a coffee when the employee said: "He didn't get the message; we don't serve cops here." (Video via WVIT

Police say the officer left the store immediately with the manager and employee following behind. The employee told the officer she was just joking and apologized, but some people aren't buying it. 

"It's disrespectful I think to someone who's willing to put on a uniform and carry a gun and try and protect me and my town and keep it safe," one resident said.

The backlash doesn't come at a great time for the company. Just last week, Dunkin' Brands announced it would be closing 100 stores in the U.S. after estimating slower sales growth. (Video via Dunkin' Donuts

Dunkin' Donuts released a statement saying: "The crew member exhibited poor judgment and apologized immediately to the police officer. The franchise owner, a long-time supporter of local police, has also reached out to apologize on behalf of the restaurant." 

There's been no word yet if the employee will face disciplinary action.

This video includes images from Getty Images. 

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