(Thumbnail image: Motorola)

 

Get more multi-source tech news from Newsy.com.

 

“Verizon has welcomed the third Droid to the family of its Android powered touchscreen smartphones.  This is Motorola’s Droid X.  It’s the biggest Android that works with Verizon’s service, with a 4.3 inch screen.  That’s the same size as Sprint’s popular HTC Evo.” (Miami Herald)

 

 

 

Verizon sold out of its newest Droid offering, despite promises that wouldn’t happen.

 

That’s good news and bad news, depending on which side of the equation you’re on.

 

We’re analyzing coverage of the release and some of the early public reviews of Droid X from The Miami Herald, Eweek, CNET, PCWorld and The Washington Post.

 

First, to the sale of Droid X.  Verizon assured buyers, there would be plenty to go around.  But there weren’t.  E-week points out, that’s not an entirely bad problem to have.

 

“Verizon's shortage is a spot of bad news for the No. 1 wireless company in the United States. But it is bound to put a smile on the face of the Google Android team... Sellouts mean a lot of people are buying the phones, which Google hopes to seed with mobile ads.”

 

The Miami Herald’s Bridget Carey on what she likes, and doesn’t like, about the Droid X.

 

“The large screen makes it easier on the eyes for reading.  Something to keep in mind if you wanna read books from Amazon’s kindle app. And it’s easier on the fingers for typing.” (Flash) “It forces all your images to be horizontal when sending them to your friends, even if the images are supposed to be vertical.  I hope they can fix that in a software update down the line.”

 

PC World notes -- cool features aside -- Droid X may create problems for meddling techies, bent on breaking the rules.

 

“Reports surfaced on Thursday warning enterprising Droid X users that the phone could be rendered useless if rooted, due to an encrypted bootloader installed on the device. Basically, if you try to hack the device and install Android 2.2 by yourself, then you might end up with a bricked phone.”

 

 

CNET reviewers say, that’s just a little bit controlling, for an operating system that allows people to create their own apps.

 

“It’s very insecure.  It probably wouldn’t sound like that.  It’s like, ‘no don’t change me.  I’m good just the way I am.  Everybody loves me.’”

 

The Washington Post’s Rob Pogoraro says, while DroidX definitely has the “wow” factor out of the box, he’s more a fan of Droid’s older models.

 

“...after a couple of weeks of testing one loaned by Verizon's PR department, I prefer its older sibling, the Droid Incredible. That may explain why Verizon still can't meet demand for the Incredible, months after it shipped.”

So what do you think of the latest Droid? 

 

 

 

Droid X Sells Out on First Day

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Jul 17, 2010

Droid X Sells Out on First Day

(Thumbnail image: Motorola)

 

Get more multi-source tech news from Newsy.com.

 

“Verizon has welcomed the third Droid to the family of its Android powered touchscreen smartphones.  This is Motorola’s Droid X.  It’s the biggest Android that works with Verizon’s service, with a 4.3 inch screen.  That’s the same size as Sprint’s popular HTC Evo.” (Miami Herald)

 

 

 

Verizon sold out of its newest Droid offering, despite promises that wouldn’t happen.

 

That’s good news and bad news, depending on which side of the equation you’re on.

 

We’re analyzing coverage of the release and some of the early public reviews of Droid X from The Miami Herald, Eweek, CNET, PCWorld and The Washington Post.

 

First, to the sale of Droid X.  Verizon assured buyers, there would be plenty to go around.  But there weren’t.  E-week points out, that’s not an entirely bad problem to have.

 

“Verizon's shortage is a spot of bad news for the No. 1 wireless company in the United States. But it is bound to put a smile on the face of the Google Android team... Sellouts mean a lot of people are buying the phones, which Google hopes to seed with mobile ads.”

 

The Miami Herald’s Bridget Carey on what she likes, and doesn’t like, about the Droid X.

 

“The large screen makes it easier on the eyes for reading.  Something to keep in mind if you wanna read books from Amazon’s kindle app. And it’s easier on the fingers for typing.” (Flash) “It forces all your images to be horizontal when sending them to your friends, even if the images are supposed to be vertical.  I hope they can fix that in a software update down the line.”

 

PC World notes -- cool features aside -- Droid X may create problems for meddling techies, bent on breaking the rules.

 

“Reports surfaced on Thursday warning enterprising Droid X users that the phone could be rendered useless if rooted, due to an encrypted bootloader installed on the device. Basically, if you try to hack the device and install Android 2.2 by yourself, then you might end up with a bricked phone.”

 

 

CNET reviewers say, that’s just a little bit controlling, for an operating system that allows people to create their own apps.

 

“It’s very insecure.  It probably wouldn’t sound like that.  It’s like, ‘no don’t change me.  I’m good just the way I am.  Everybody loves me.’”

 

The Washington Post’s Rob Pogoraro says, while DroidX definitely has the “wow” factor out of the box, he’s more a fan of Droid’s older models.

 

“...after a couple of weeks of testing one loaned by Verizon's PR department, I prefer its older sibling, the Droid Incredible. That may explain why Verizon still can't meet demand for the Incredible, months after it shipped.”

So what do you think of the latest Droid? 

 

 

 

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