Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

BY: NICHOLE CARTMELL

There is a new push to make HIV testing part of a routine doctor’s check-up. WLEX has the details.

“A U.S. government backed panel of doctors is recommending that everyone between 15 and 65 years old get tested for HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.”

According to KSWO, key to this proposal is the goal for earlier detection. Catching the disease sooner could mean a sharp reduction in the spread of AIDS and in AIDS-related deaths.

“About 1.2 million people in the U.S. are HIV positive, and about one in five of them -- doesn't know it. Those... are believed to transmit about 20,000 new cases of AIDS each year.”

ABC News reports before now the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force only recommended high risk individuals get tested — like those who have unprotected sex or use injectable drugs. But Time reports new information has motivated health officials to begin devising practical ways of making prevention a priority for everyone.

“Our treatments have gotten better and they’ve gotten easier. All those things have worked together to change the balance so that it now appears that general screening makes it likely that across the whole population we will have healthier people.”

According to the Associated Press, the task force guidelines could increase the number of people eligible for an HIV screening without having a co-pay in their doctor's office. This co-pay would be covered by the free preventive care under the Obama administration's health care law. A blogger for ThinkProgress says this extension in Obamacare represents an important step forward for HIV-positive individuals.

“Guaranteed coverage for HIV testing isn’t the only way that the health reform law will help combat the virus; Obamacare also increases resources for HIV research and prevention, helps ensure that the drugs for HIV treatment are more affordable, and prevents insurance companies from discriminating against Americans simply based on their HIV status.”

ABC News says other important task force recommendations included screening for breast and colon cancer, as well as high cholesterol.
 

Doctors Make New Push For HIV Testing

by Nichole Cartmell
0
Transcript
Nov 21, 2012

Doctors Make New Push For HIV Testing

Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

BY: NICHOLE CARTMELL

There is a new push to make HIV testing part of a routine doctor’s check-up. WLEX has the details.

“A U.S. government backed panel of doctors is recommending that everyone between 15 and 65 years old get tested for HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.”

According to KSWO, key to this proposal is the goal for earlier detection. Catching the disease sooner could mean a sharp reduction in the spread of AIDS and in AIDS-related deaths.

“About 1.2 million people in the U.S. are HIV positive, and about one in five of them -- doesn't know it. Those... are believed to transmit about 20,000 new cases of AIDS each year.”

ABC News reports before now the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force only recommended high risk individuals get tested — like those who have unprotected sex or use injectable drugs. But Time reports new information has motivated health officials to begin devising practical ways of making prevention a priority for everyone.

“Our treatments have gotten better and they’ve gotten easier. All those things have worked together to change the balance so that it now appears that general screening makes it likely that across the whole population we will have healthier people.”

According to the Associated Press, the task force guidelines could increase the number of people eligible for an HIV screening without having a co-pay in their doctor's office. This co-pay would be covered by the free preventive care under the Obama administration's health care law. A blogger for ThinkProgress says this extension in Obamacare represents an important step forward for HIV-positive individuals.

“Guaranteed coverage for HIV testing isn’t the only way that the health reform law will help combat the virus; Obamacare also increases resources for HIV research and prevention, helps ensure that the drugs for HIV treatment are more affordable, and prevents insurance companies from discriminating against Americans simply based on their HIV status.”

ABC News says other important task force recommendations included screening for breast and colon cancer, as well as high cholesterol.
 

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