(Image source: Twitter / @SenatorKirk)

BY CHRISTINA HARTMAN AND NATHAN BYRNE

 

ANCHOR MEGAN MURPHY

 

An optimistic welcome for the 113th Congress is born out of the sarcastic goodbyes to the 112th.

 

“Will it be any less dysfunctional than the last one? We certainly hope so.”

[VIDEO: Bloomberg]

 

“Goodbye 112th Congress. Don’t let the door hit you on the way out.”

[VIDEO: MSNBC]

 

“The 113th Congress about to be sworn in, which I think we’re all in agreement is good news, because we get rid of the 112th Congress.”

[VIDEO: Fox Business]


All that aside, the 113th will be the most diverse Congress in history — with women, gay and lesbian members, and religious and racial minorities headed to Washington in record numbers.

In Arizona, voters picked former state Senator Kyrsten Sinema to represent the state’s newly-created 9th Congressional district. She is the body’s first openly bisexual member — who billed herself the “voice for the forgotten middle class.”

“I get it because as a kid our stepfather was unemployed. Our family lived in an abandoned gas station for two years without running water or electricity.”

In Hawaii, Democrat Mazie Hirono represents a few firsts: the state’s first elected female senator, first U.S. senator born in Japan, and the U.S. Senate’s first Buddhist.

Also from Hawaii — Democrat Tulsi Gabbard is the first Hindu in Congress. She’s also a Company Commander with the Hawaii Army National Guard, and served a 12-month tour in Iraq with a field medical unit.

Along with Hawaii, North Dakota and Wisconsin, Massachusetts also sent a woman to the Senate for the first time.

In a closely-watched race Democrat Elizabeth Warren beat Republican incumbent Scott Brown to become the state’s first female senator.

WARREN: “We are called to restore opportunity for every American.”

And New Hampshire became the first state ever to send an all-women congressional delegation to Washington — with two House reps joining two female senators already representing the state.

To boot, the state also elected a female governor in Maggie Hassan.

North Dakota — along with Hawaii, Massachusetts and Wisconsin — elected its first woman to the Senate.

Heidi Heitkamp actually ran for governor in 2000, but lost. She’s technically North Dakota’s second female senator, but the first one to be elected.

Wisconsin voters elected a woman to the U.S. Senate for the first time.
Baldwin isn’t just the Badger State’s first woman sent to the upper chamber, but she’s also the first ever openly gay person to be elected to the Senate.

BALDWIN: “I didn’t run to make history, I ran to make a difference.”
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P8HTJbhvxWc

The 113th Congress will include the most women, Latino and LGBT members ever. As California Democrat Representative Michael Honda wrote for The Hill:

“This is what democracy looks like: It is a kaleidoscope of language, culture, and color, and what an incredible record-breaking moment this is for America.”

The 112th Congress leaves behind a 12 percent approval rating and a reputation as one of the least productive in history.

Diverse 113th Congress Convenes as 112th Says Goodbye

by Christina Hartman
0
Transcript
Jan 3, 2013

Diverse 113th Congress Convenes as 112th Says Goodbye

(Image source: Twitter / @SenatorKirk)

BY CHRISTINA HARTMAN AND NATHAN BYRNE

 

ANCHOR MEGAN MURPHY

 

An optimistic welcome for the 113th Congress is born out of the sarcastic goodbyes to the 112th.

 

“Will it be any less dysfunctional than the last one? We certainly hope so.”

[VIDEO: Bloomberg]

 

“Goodbye 112th Congress. Don’t let the door hit you on the way out.”

[VIDEO: MSNBC]

 

“The 113th Congress about to be sworn in, which I think we’re all in agreement is good news, because we get rid of the 112th Congress.”

[VIDEO: Fox Business]


All that aside, the 113th will be the most diverse Congress in history — with women, gay and lesbian members, and religious and racial minorities headed to Washington in record numbers.

In Arizona, voters picked former state Senator Kyrsten Sinema to represent the state’s newly-created 9th Congressional district. She is the body’s first openly bisexual member — who billed herself the “voice for the forgotten middle class.”

“I get it because as a kid our stepfather was unemployed. Our family lived in an abandoned gas station for two years without running water or electricity.”

In Hawaii, Democrat Mazie Hirono represents a few firsts: the state’s first elected female senator, first U.S. senator born in Japan, and the U.S. Senate’s first Buddhist.

Also from Hawaii — Democrat Tulsi Gabbard is the first Hindu in Congress. She’s also a Company Commander with the Hawaii Army National Guard, and served a 12-month tour in Iraq with a field medical unit.

Along with Hawaii, North Dakota and Wisconsin, Massachusetts also sent a woman to the Senate for the first time.

In a closely-watched race Democrat Elizabeth Warren beat Republican incumbent Scott Brown to become the state’s first female senator.

WARREN: “We are called to restore opportunity for every American.”

And New Hampshire became the first state ever to send an all-women congressional delegation to Washington — with two House reps joining two female senators already representing the state.

To boot, the state also elected a female governor in Maggie Hassan.

North Dakota — along with Hawaii, Massachusetts and Wisconsin — elected its first woman to the Senate.

Heidi Heitkamp actually ran for governor in 2000, but lost. She’s technically North Dakota’s second female senator, but the first one to be elected.

Wisconsin voters elected a woman to the U.S. Senate for the first time.
Baldwin isn’t just the Badger State’s first woman sent to the upper chamber, but she’s also the first ever openly gay person to be elected to the Senate.

BALDWIN: “I didn’t run to make history, I ran to make a difference.”
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P8HTJbhvxWc

The 113th Congress will include the most women, Latino and LGBT members ever. As California Democrat Representative Michael Honda wrote for The Hill:

“This is what democracy looks like: It is a kaleidoscope of language, culture, and color, and what an incredible record-breaking moment this is for America.”

The 112th Congress leaves behind a 12 percent approval rating and a reputation as one of the least productive in history.

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