(Image source: The Irish Times) 

 

 

BY ELIZABETH HAGEDORN  

ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS

 

 

 

Renewed pressure now on Ireland’s government to redefine its abortion laws -- this following the death of an Indian woman after she was denied a potentially life saving abortion.

Last month, 31-year-old Savita Halappanavar went to the hospital complaining of agonizing back pain where doctors there told her she was in the midst of a miscarriage.

But her husband says doctors wouldn’t perform an abortion because there was a fetal heartbeat. After suffering the miscarriage, Savita died from blood poisoning.

Ireland --  a predominantly Catholic country, has some the world’s most restrictive abortion laws, outlawing termination even in the cases of rape or incest.

While the law says doctors can intervene if the mother is at risk of death, what the law doesn’t say is how much of a threat to mother’s life there must be to allow for a termination -- leaving doctors to make the call. Sky News explains.

“There is an investigation going on, but the thing that is most interesting about this is is to see whether it finally clears a kind of log jam in Ireland where they have the legal framework to carry out abortions legally, but they didn’t use it.”

Savita’s death has sparked a public outcry from those in Ireland who say her death could have been prevented with an abortion. Thousands rallied outside Ireland’s parliament calling for reform to Ireland’s abortion laws, and protests have been planned at Irish embassies throughout the globe.

The Irish Deputy Prime Minister has since said Ireland would act quickly to clarify the abortion laws, and CNN’s Indian Broadcast Network reports the Indian government plans on closely monitoring investigations into Savita’s death.

“Even if it does take the matter up at a government to government level, we’ve been told that we shouldn’t expect too much out of India’s intervention.”

The UK’s Department of Health estimates about 4,000 Irish women travel to England each year for abortions.

Death of Woman Denied Abortion in Ireland Causes Outrage

by Elizabeth Hagedorn
0
Transcript
Nov 15, 2012

Death of Woman Denied Abortion in Ireland Causes Outrage

(Image source: The Irish Times) 

 

 

BY ELIZABETH HAGEDORN  

ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS

 

 

 

Renewed pressure now on Ireland’s government to redefine its abortion laws -- this following the death of an Indian woman after she was denied a potentially life saving abortion.

Last month, 31-year-old Savita Halappanavar went to the hospital complaining of agonizing back pain where doctors there told her she was in the midst of a miscarriage.

But her husband says doctors wouldn’t perform an abortion because there was a fetal heartbeat. After suffering the miscarriage, Savita died from blood poisoning.

Ireland --  a predominantly Catholic country, has some the world’s most restrictive abortion laws, outlawing termination even in the cases of rape or incest.

While the law says doctors can intervene if the mother is at risk of death, what the law doesn’t say is how much of a threat to mother’s life there must be to allow for a termination -- leaving doctors to make the call. Sky News explains.

“There is an investigation going on, but the thing that is most interesting about this is is to see whether it finally clears a kind of log jam in Ireland where they have the legal framework to carry out abortions legally, but they didn’t use it.”

Savita’s death has sparked a public outcry from those in Ireland who say her death could have been prevented with an abortion. Thousands rallied outside Ireland’s parliament calling for reform to Ireland’s abortion laws, and protests have been planned at Irish embassies throughout the globe.

The Irish Deputy Prime Minister has since said Ireland would act quickly to clarify the abortion laws, and CNN’s Indian Broadcast Network reports the Indian government plans on closely monitoring investigations into Savita’s death.

“Even if it does take the matter up at a government to government level, we’ve been told that we shouldn’t expect too much out of India’s intervention.”

The UK’s Department of Health estimates about 4,000 Irish women travel to England each year for abortions.

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