(Image source: Wikimedia Commons)

 

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS

 

 

Across the morning talk shows Sunday, there was evidence that a deal to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff might be had between Democrats and Republicans. David Axelrod, a senior adviser to President Barack Obama, told CBS there’s room around the edges to work with Republicans.

 

"I think that the Speaker's comments have been encouraging … there's money to be gained by closing some of these loopholes and applying them to deficit reduction."

 

And on Fox News Sunday, conservative columnist Bill Kristol gave up ground on the issue of ending the Bush-era tax cuts for the wealthiest Americans — marking quite the turn from both his previous comments and from the GOP’s hardline stance over the past year.

 

"It won't kill the country if we raise taxes a little bit on millionaires. It really won't, I don't think. I don't really understand why Republicans don't take Obama's offer…. Really? The Republican Party is going to fall on its sword to defend a bunch of millionaires, half of whom voted Democratic?”

 

This comes two days after President Obama reiterated that any deal to avoid automatic cuts put in place last year would have to involve not just the spending cuts Republicans hope for, but also various ways to bring more money into the federal government.

 

"If we're serious about reducing the deficit we have to combine spending cuts with revenue. That means asking the wealthy to pay a little more in taxes."

 

Democrats scored big wins in Senate elections and in the race for the U.S. presidency last week, a development that could bring Republicans closer to compromise on key issues, including debt reduction.

 

Republican House Speaker John Boehner will be tasked with herding members of his own party into a unified position on ending tax cuts and loopholes — not an easy task, considering that includes members of the Tea Party more reluctant to the change, but he does have his allies.

 

Oklahoma Republican Tom Cole told The New York Times:

 

“Most members were just taught a lesson that you’re not going to get everything that you want. It was that kind of election.”

 

Any deal to increase revenue and decide on cuts will have to take place before the fiscal cliff goes into effect at the end of January.

Compromise on Horizon to Avert 'Fiscal Cliff'?

by Zach Toombs
1
Transcript
Nov 11, 2012

Compromise on Horizon to Avert 'Fiscal Cliff'?

(Image source: Wikimedia Commons)

 

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS

 

 

Across the morning talk shows Sunday, there was evidence that a deal to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff might be had between Democrats and Republicans. David Axelrod, a senior adviser to President Barack Obama, told CBS there’s room around the edges to work with Republicans.

 

"I think that the Speaker's comments have been encouraging … there's money to be gained by closing some of these loopholes and applying them to deficit reduction."

 

And on Fox News Sunday, conservative columnist Bill Kristol gave up ground on the issue of ending the Bush-era tax cuts for the wealthiest Americans — marking quite the turn from both his previous comments and from the GOP’s hardline stance over the past year.

 

"It won't kill the country if we raise taxes a little bit on millionaires. It really won't, I don't think. I don't really understand why Republicans don't take Obama's offer…. Really? The Republican Party is going to fall on its sword to defend a bunch of millionaires, half of whom voted Democratic?”

 

This comes two days after President Obama reiterated that any deal to avoid automatic cuts put in place last year would have to involve not just the spending cuts Republicans hope for, but also various ways to bring more money into the federal government.

 

"If we're serious about reducing the deficit we have to combine spending cuts with revenue. That means asking the wealthy to pay a little more in taxes."

 

Democrats scored big wins in Senate elections and in the race for the U.S. presidency last week, a development that could bring Republicans closer to compromise on key issues, including debt reduction.

 

Republican House Speaker John Boehner will be tasked with herding members of his own party into a unified position on ending tax cuts and loopholes — not an easy task, considering that includes members of the Tea Party more reluctant to the change, but he does have his allies.

 

Oklahoma Republican Tom Cole told The New York Times:

 

“Most members were just taught a lesson that you’re not going to get everything that you want. It was that kind of election.”

 

Any deal to increase revenue and decide on cuts will have to take place before the fiscal cliff goes into effect at the end of January.

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