(Image source: Atlanta Journal-Constitution)


BY ERIK SHUTE

You're watching multisource world news analysis from Newsy

Is China -- schooling the United States?  It appears so, after a review of just-released results of an international assessment test.  On Tuesday, the Organization for Economic Cooperative Development released the results for its global triennial test: the Program for International Student Assessment, or PISA.

In the past three tests, Finland received the gold star every time.  But this year, MSNBC reports, Finland’s out, the U.S. was left sleeping in class, and the “new kid” aced the exam.

“Among the 34 top developed nations, American kids are average.  The U.S. scored 14th in reading, 17th in science, and 25th in math, slightly higher than the last time the tests were given.  But the really stunning news comes from China and the providence of Shanghai, where students scored better than anyone else in the world after taking the test for the first time.”

ABC asks, “How did China manage to school the competition?”  The network recently visited Asia -- and saw China’s rampant education growth.

“On average Chinese students attend 41 more days of school every year.  And with some attending classes on the weekends it amounts to 30% more hours of instruction every year too. China and now much of Asia sees a future beyond those factories.”

The news prompted those responsible for education reform in America to weigh in.  Education Secretary Arne Duncan pointed to China’s performance, calling it this generation’s “Space Race.”  In Bloomberg, he sounded off -- saying the nation’s education is in timeout.

“‘The brutal fact here is there are many countries that are far ahead of us and improving more rapidly than we are,’ Duncan said. ‘This should be a massive wake-up call to the entire country.’”

Then there’s U.S. Rep. George Miller, chairman of the House Education and Labor Committee.  The Huffington Post caught his take on the word “average.”

“Average won’t help us regain our global role as a leader in education. Average won’t help our students get the jobs of tomorrow. Average is the status quo and it’s failing our country."

But writer Valerie Strauss thinks what we need is a recess.  She cites in The Washington Post this classroom calamity misses the point -- PISA is not a dissection of China as a whole.

“…let’s not get ahead of ourselves here.  Shanghai is not representative of the entire Chinese population, and China makes no pretense of trying to educate the entire populace, as we do.”

Among the test’s top ten performers -- South Korea, Japan, and Taiwan -- all of course located in Asia. So what do you think?  Will the U.S. cram before the next test, or is this wake up call the proverbial writing on the wall?

Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy

Transcript by Newsy

China Tops International Education Rankings

by Nathan Giannini
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Transcript
Dec 8, 2010

China Tops International Education Rankings

(Image source: Atlanta Journal-Constitution)


BY ERIK SHUTE

You're watching multisource world news analysis from Newsy

Is China -- schooling the United States?  It appears so, after a review of just-released results of an international assessment test.  On Tuesday, the Organization for Economic Cooperative Development released the results for its global triennial test: the Program for International Student Assessment, or PISA.

In the past three tests, Finland received the gold star every time.  But this year, MSNBC reports, Finland’s out, the U.S. was left sleeping in class, and the “new kid” aced the exam.

“Among the 34 top developed nations, American kids are average.  The U.S. scored 14th in reading, 17th in science, and 25th in math, slightly higher than the last time the tests were given.  But the really stunning news comes from China and the providence of Shanghai, where students scored better than anyone else in the world after taking the test for the first time.”

ABC asks, “How did China manage to school the competition?”  The network recently visited Asia -- and saw China’s rampant education growth.

“On average Chinese students attend 41 more days of school every year.  And with some attending classes on the weekends it amounts to 30% more hours of instruction every year too. China and now much of Asia sees a future beyond those factories.”

The news prompted those responsible for education reform in America to weigh in.  Education Secretary Arne Duncan pointed to China’s performance, calling it this generation’s “Space Race.”  In Bloomberg, he sounded off -- saying the nation’s education is in timeout.

“‘The brutal fact here is there are many countries that are far ahead of us and improving more rapidly than we are,’ Duncan said. ‘This should be a massive wake-up call to the entire country.’”

Then there’s U.S. Rep. George Miller, chairman of the House Education and Labor Committee.  The Huffington Post caught his take on the word “average.”

“Average won’t help us regain our global role as a leader in education. Average won’t help our students get the jobs of tomorrow. Average is the status quo and it’s failing our country."

But writer Valerie Strauss thinks what we need is a recess.  She cites in The Washington Post this classroom calamity misses the point -- PISA is not a dissection of China as a whole.

“…let’s not get ahead of ourselves here.  Shanghai is not representative of the entire Chinese population, and China makes no pretense of trying to educate the entire populace, as we do.”

Among the test’s top ten performers -- South Korea, Japan, and Taiwan -- all of course located in Asia. So what do you think?  Will the U.S. cram before the next test, or is this wake up call the proverbial writing on the wall?

Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy

Transcript by Newsy

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