(Image Source: The Guardian

BY SCOTT MALONE

ANCHOR LAUREN GORES

China’s government continues to tighten the screws on the country’s Internet users and providers. On Friday, Chinese lawmakers signed a new set of rules into law. KHNL and KTTV have the details.

“The rules require users to now register their real names. The new rules follow online postings about abuses that rattled the ruling party.”

“Legalizing the deletion of posts or pages which are deemed to contain illegal information and requiring service providers to hand over such information to authorities for punishment.”

But the new rules don’t specify what exactly constitutes illegal information. Some internet users say this is more of the same as the Chinese government continues to crack down on free-flowing conversations.

“The government has been repeatedly imposing restrictive measures. It even spent billions of dollars to build a firewall against overseas sites. They just don’t want to see any freedom of speech provided by the constitution.” (Via Al Jazeera)

And a writer for Voice of America points out-- despite the government’s claims the new laws won’t hinder citizens’ ability to expose corruption online, the removal of anonymous postings will have a chilling effect on reporting that corruption.

But a writer for the China Daily disagrees, saying the changes “bring order and rules to China’s cyberspace.”

The new rules also include measures to reduce spam sent to mobile phones and e-mail addresses.

China Tightens Controls on Internet Use

by Scott Malone
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Transcript
Dec 28, 2012

China Tightens Controls on Internet Use

 

(Image Source: The Guardian

BY SCOTT MALONE

ANCHOR LAUREN GORES

China’s government continues to tighten the screws on the country’s Internet users and providers. On Friday, Chinese lawmakers signed a new set of rules into law. KHNL and KTTV have the details.

“The rules require users to now register their real names. The new rules follow online postings about abuses that rattled the ruling party.”

“Legalizing the deletion of posts or pages which are deemed to contain illegal information and requiring service providers to hand over such information to authorities for punishment.”

But the new rules don’t specify what exactly constitutes illegal information. Some internet users say this is more of the same as the Chinese government continues to crack down on free-flowing conversations.

“The government has been repeatedly imposing restrictive measures. It even spent billions of dollars to build a firewall against overseas sites. They just don’t want to see any freedom of speech provided by the constitution.” (Via Al Jazeera)

And a writer for Voice of America points out-- despite the government’s claims the new laws won’t hinder citizens’ ability to expose corruption online, the removal of anonymous postings will have a chilling effect on reporting that corruption.

But a writer for the China Daily disagrees, saying the changes “bring order and rules to China’s cyberspace.”

The new rules also include measures to reduce spam sent to mobile phones and e-mail addresses.

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