(Image source: The Guardian)

 

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS

 

 

A bold announcement from China on Thursday, as the far east nation promised to board and commandeer any vessel entering into the highly-dispute South China Sea.

 

It’s a region claimed by the Phillipines, Brunei, Malaysia and Vietnam — rich in deposits of oil and natural gas. [Sky News]

 

But China is the nation in that mix with the naval resources to effectively patrol those waters. And its latest policy there will no doubt heighten tensions even further in a region that holds a third of the world’s trade routes. [NTDTV]

 

The order to board foreign vessels will take effect Jan. 1, and it was given specifically to Chinese forces at the island of Hainan, a jumping off point for the nation’s ships in the South China Sea. Leaders in the Philippines say China is making a bad situation much worse.

 

The commander of western Philippines military forces told Inquirer News:

 

“That’s too much. While we are exerting all peaceful means (to resolve the territorial dispute), that is what they (are doing).”

 

Although the U.S. has historically shown little interest in the region, President Barack Obama has frequently turned his focus to the South China Sea. In April, he reached an agreement with Australian leaders to station more U.S. marines there.

 

China, too, has been flexing its military might at sea. As seen in this video from The Guardian, the nation completed its first successful landing of a jet on its maiden aircraft carrier, the Liaoning, this week.  

China Says it Will Board Ships in South China Sea

by Zach Toombs
0
Transcript
Nov 29, 2012

China Says it Will Board Ships in South China Sea

 

(Image source: The Guardian)

 

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS

 

 

A bold announcement from China on Thursday, as the far east nation promised to board and commandeer any vessel entering into the highly-dispute South China Sea.

 

It’s a region claimed by the Phillipines, Brunei, Malaysia and Vietnam — rich in deposits of oil and natural gas. [Sky News]

 

But China is the nation in that mix with the naval resources to effectively patrol those waters. And its latest policy there will no doubt heighten tensions even further in a region that holds a third of the world’s trade routes. [NTDTV]

 

The order to board foreign vessels will take effect Jan. 1, and it was given specifically to Chinese forces at the island of Hainan, a jumping off point for the nation’s ships in the South China Sea. Leaders in the Philippines say China is making a bad situation much worse.

 

The commander of western Philippines military forces told Inquirer News:

 

“That’s too much. While we are exerting all peaceful means (to resolve the territorial dispute), that is what they (are doing).”

 

Although the U.S. has historically shown little interest in the region, President Barack Obama has frequently turned his focus to the South China Sea. In April, he reached an agreement with Australian leaders to station more U.S. marines there.

 

China, too, has been flexing its military might at sea. As seen in this video from The Guardian, the nation completed its first successful landing of a jet on its maiden aircraft carrier, the Liaoning, this week.  

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