(Image source: Xinhua)

 

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS

 

 

A conflict between China and Japan that began at sea escalated to the air this week — as both nations dispatched fighter jets in a move meant to show neither side is backing down.

 

It’s a small, uninhabited group of islands that has raised tensions to their highest peak in years between the world’s second and third largest economies. Known to the Chinese as the Diaoyu Islands, and to Japan as the Senkaku, this territory holds natural gas and other resources. [Video: NTDTV]

 

Last week, China sent a twin-propeller civilian surveillance plane to fly over the islands. In response, Tokyo scrambled F-15 fighter jets to patrol the area that it claims as its own. Now, China, too, has sent fighter jets to patrol the islands. [Video: BBC]

 

It’s a significant escalation for a dispute that so far has only seen water cannon fights between vessels, as seen on RT. China claims Japan stole the islands through war in the late 1800s — though Japan says previous to that, they weren’t owned by any nation.

 

Chinese citizens have staged sometimes violent anti-Japan protests over the islands dispute. The Financial Times reports, for China, the conflict opens up old wounds.

 

“For many Chinese, Tokyo’s control of the islands, which were incorporated as part of Japanese territory in the late 19th century, is a legacy of past imperial bullying — one that an increasingly powerful China can no longer tolerate.” 

 

Japan’s new prime minister, Shinzo Abe, has a lot on his plate. Severe economic stagnation is one of his chief concerns — but the islands dispute is a roadblock. [Video: euronews]

 

The Obama administration has put off Shinzo’s planned visit to Washington this week, likely to avoid inserting the U.S. into an already-heated conflict. [Image: Bloomberg]

 

China is a nation on the rise — and The New York Times reports capturing the Diaoyu islands, though they are tiny, is part of a larger plan.
 

“That would give China a break in what is known in China as the ‘first island chain,’ a string including the Diaoyu, that prevents China’s growing ballistic submarine fleet from having unobserved access to the Pacific Ocean.” 

 

Taiwan and islands held by Vietnam and the Philippines also make up that “first island chain” drawing a ring along China’s coast.

China, Japan Dispatch Fighter Jets Over Islands

by Zach Toombs
0
Transcript
Jan 19, 2013

China, Japan Dispatch Fighter Jets Over Islands

(Image source: Xinhua)

 

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS

 

 

A conflict between China and Japan that began at sea escalated to the air this week — as both nations dispatched fighter jets in a move meant to show neither side is backing down.

 

It’s a small, uninhabited group of islands that has raised tensions to their highest peak in years between the world’s second and third largest economies. Known to the Chinese as the Diaoyu Islands, and to Japan as the Senkaku, this territory holds natural gas and other resources. [Video: NTDTV]

 

Last week, China sent a twin-propeller civilian surveillance plane to fly over the islands. In response, Tokyo scrambled F-15 fighter jets to patrol the area that it claims as its own. Now, China, too, has sent fighter jets to patrol the islands. [Video: BBC]

 

It’s a significant escalation for a dispute that so far has only seen water cannon fights between vessels, as seen on RT. China claims Japan stole the islands through war in the late 1800s — though Japan says previous to that, they weren’t owned by any nation.

 

Chinese citizens have staged sometimes violent anti-Japan protests over the islands dispute. The Financial Times reports, for China, the conflict opens up old wounds.

 

“For many Chinese, Tokyo’s control of the islands, which were incorporated as part of Japanese territory in the late 19th century, is a legacy of past imperial bullying — one that an increasingly powerful China can no longer tolerate.” 

 

Japan’s new prime minister, Shinzo Abe, has a lot on his plate. Severe economic stagnation is one of his chief concerns — but the islands dispute is a roadblock. [Video: euronews]

 

The Obama administration has put off Shinzo’s planned visit to Washington this week, likely to avoid inserting the U.S. into an already-heated conflict. [Image: Bloomberg]

 

China is a nation on the rise — and The New York Times reports capturing the Diaoyu islands, though they are tiny, is part of a larger plan.
 

“That would give China a break in what is known in China as the ‘first island chain,’ a string including the Diaoyu, that prevents China’s growing ballistic submarine fleet from having unobserved access to the Pacific Ocean.” 

 

Taiwan and islands held by Vietnam and the Philippines also make up that “first island chain” drawing a ring along China’s coast.

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