(Image Source: Expresso.pt)

BY REGINA WANG

ANCHOR LAUREN ZIMA

No real name means no more posts, China warned its Internet users on Friday. To use Twitter-like microblogging sites in the country, users now have to provide their state-issued ID and telephone numbers.


According to Free Asia Radio, Hong Kong’s China Human Rights Defender calls the new Internet regulations “the most alarming development” in government censorship.

“The thriving domestic microblogsphere has proved highly effective in exposing government misconduct during the past few years, but it is now threatened with curtailment as a result of this requirement”

The Telegraph reports China is also demanding the country’s largest microblogging site, Sina Weibo [pronounced “way-bore”] delete posts of users with more than 100,000 followers that might damage national interests. This must be done within five minutes. China says the regulations are aimed to stop the spread of false rumors.

“Wang Chen, a minister at the State Council Information Office, warned that microblogging can have a ‘big influence, cover a wide population, and mobilise people’, a potent combination for a party that is determined to keep a tight control on its population.”

Others say the new regulations show the government intensifying its watch on social-media uproar. The Wall Street Journal reports when a politician with celebrity-level popularity, Bo Xilai [pronounced: “Bore See lie”], was ousted, the news had generated 60,000 reposts and 15,000 comments within three hours.

“Many learned of the news through microblogs, demonstrating the threat they pose to the Chinese government's hold on vital information.”

According to Xinhua [pronounced: Sing Wha], a state-controlled news agency, there are close to 600 million registered microblogging IDs in China.

 

 

China Bans Anonymity Among Microblog Users

by Adnan Khan
0
Transcript
Mar 18, 2012

China Bans Anonymity Among Microblog Users

 


(Image Source: Expresso.pt)

BY REGINA WANG

ANCHOR LAUREN ZIMA

No real name means no more posts, China warned its Internet users on Friday. To use Twitter-like microblogging sites in the country, users now have to provide their state-issued ID and telephone numbers.


According to Free Asia Radio, Hong Kong’s China Human Rights Defender calls the new Internet regulations “the most alarming development” in government censorship.

“The thriving domestic microblogsphere has proved highly effective in exposing government misconduct during the past few years, but it is now threatened with curtailment as a result of this requirement”

The Telegraph reports China is also demanding the country’s largest microblogging site, Sina Weibo [pronounced “way-bore”] delete posts of users with more than 100,000 followers that might damage national interests. This must be done within five minutes. China says the regulations are aimed to stop the spread of false rumors.

“Wang Chen, a minister at the State Council Information Office, warned that microblogging can have a ‘big influence, cover a wide population, and mobilise people’, a potent combination for a party that is determined to keep a tight control on its population.”

Others say the new regulations show the government intensifying its watch on social-media uproar. The Wall Street Journal reports when a politician with celebrity-level popularity, Bo Xilai [pronounced: “Bore See lie”], was ousted, the news had generated 60,000 reposts and 15,000 comments within three hours.

“Many learned of the news through microblogs, demonstrating the threat they pose to the Chinese government's hold on vital information.”

According to Xinhua [pronounced: Sing Wha], a state-controlled news agency, there are close to 600 million registered microblogging IDs in China.

 

 

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