(Image source: The Environmental Blog)

 

 

BY JASMINE BAILEY 


China is one of the world’s most polluted countries, and now the government is admitting the pollution has caused a visible health decline in places known as “cancer villages.”

A map released by Chinese newspaper the Global Times shows the locations throughout the country where the cancer rate is higher than the national average, often in cities with large factories nearby.

The Shanghaiist reports: “The number of Chinese cancer villagers could exceed 247, covering 27 provinces, according to a paper by a university student ... But recent researches, as cited by Xinhua, suggest the number could be over 400.”

Reporters for The Telegraph visited one of the so-called “cancer villages” in the nation where one out of every four deaths is caused by cancer, making it the biggest killer in the country.

And while much of the cancer can be attributed to the high addiction rate to cigarettes, the BBC reports there are many other factors that go into the pollution rate that is almost 40 times higher than international safe levels.


“It now burns half of all the world’s coal. A generation ago Beijing had few cars; now it has 5 million …  China’s development, its modernization, has been extraordinary, but this is the cost.”

Although the Chinese government used to tell people the pollution was fog, it now admits to a more significant pollution problem. So what’s the plan to fix it?


Tea Leaf Nation translated a statement from the Chinese government:


“The Ministry of Environmental Protection recently published the ‘Twelfth Five-Year Plan for Prevention and Control of Environmental Risks from Chemicals.’ Among its content is a clear demonstration that because of chemical poisoning, ‘cancer villages’ and other serious [threats to] social health have begun to emerge in many areas.”

That is anything but specific; however, guidelines are expected to be laid out for the future at China’s 13th international Environmental Protection Exhibition and Conference held in June, including:

 

--“Reduction of water pollutants such as urban sewage treatment facilities and supporting pipelines

--Sludge treatment and disposal

--Prevention and control of industrial water pollution

--Prevention and control of pollution by livestock and poultry breeding

--Desulphurization in key industries other than power industry”


But International Business Times points out those key industrial factors are the reason for the pollution problem.

“ … especially with large-scale factory production fueled by coal-fired power plants. The Ministry said that the levels of industrial production that occur in China would be forbidden in many other developed countries … the nation has now even become a proposed destination for those looking to continue environmentally-unfriendly production.”

According to the World Health Organization, if nothing is done to prevent it, cancer rates in China could see up to a 78 percent increase by 2030.

China Admits to 'Cancer Villages'

by Jasmine Bailey
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Transcript
Feb 23, 2013

China Admits to 'Cancer Villages'

(Image source: The Environmental Blog)

 

 

BY JASMINE BAILEY 


China is one of the world’s most polluted countries, and now the government is admitting the pollution has caused a visible health decline in places known as “cancer villages.”

A map released by Chinese newspaper the Global Times shows the locations throughout the country where the cancer rate is higher than the national average, often in cities with large factories nearby.

The Shanghaiist reports: “The number of Chinese cancer villagers could exceed 247, covering 27 provinces, according to a paper by a university student ... But recent researches, as cited by Xinhua, suggest the number could be over 400.”

Reporters for The Telegraph visited one of the so-called “cancer villages” in the nation where one out of every four deaths is caused by cancer, making it the biggest killer in the country.

And while much of the cancer can be attributed to the high addiction rate to cigarettes, the BBC reports there are many other factors that go into the pollution rate that is almost 40 times higher than international safe levels.


“It now burns half of all the world’s coal. A generation ago Beijing had few cars; now it has 5 million …  China’s development, its modernization, has been extraordinary, but this is the cost.”

Although the Chinese government used to tell people the pollution was fog, it now admits to a more significant pollution problem. So what’s the plan to fix it?


Tea Leaf Nation translated a statement from the Chinese government:


“The Ministry of Environmental Protection recently published the ‘Twelfth Five-Year Plan for Prevention and Control of Environmental Risks from Chemicals.’ Among its content is a clear demonstration that because of chemical poisoning, ‘cancer villages’ and other serious [threats to] social health have begun to emerge in many areas.”

That is anything but specific; however, guidelines are expected to be laid out for the future at China’s 13th international Environmental Protection Exhibition and Conference held in June, including:

 

--“Reduction of water pollutants such as urban sewage treatment facilities and supporting pipelines

--Sludge treatment and disposal

--Prevention and control of industrial water pollution

--Prevention and control of pollution by livestock and poultry breeding

--Desulphurization in key industries other than power industry”


But International Business Times points out those key industrial factors are the reason for the pollution problem.

“ … especially with large-scale factory production fueled by coal-fired power plants. The Ministry said that the levels of industrial production that occur in China would be forbidden in many other developed countries … the nation has now even become a proposed destination for those looking to continue environmentally-unfriendly production.”

According to the World Health Organization, if nothing is done to prevent it, cancer rates in China could see up to a 78 percent increase by 2030.

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