(Image source: Wikimedia Commons)

BY NIELS SCHACK NORGAARD

ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN

 

Hugo Chavez wants to keep his job.  But as the presidential campaign heats up in Venezuela, some doubt whether the Venezuelan strong man’s health is good enough to compete in what commentators call his toughest campaign yet.

CBS reports…

“Chávez says his doctors in Cuba have found a new lesion in his pelvic region, the same place where they removed a tumor last year. He says he will undergo surgery in the coming days.”

According to The Guardian, Mr. Chávez has admitted he would have to scale down his workaholic schedule.  But he faces tough competition from opposition leader Henrique Capriles when the people cast their votes in October. NBC reported earlier this month...

“Official results show Henrique Capriles won 62 percent of the ballot in the country’s first opposition primary vote.”

But he hasn’t gone up against Chávez who has a history of winning national elections since taking power 13 years ago. 

And in an editorial, the Washington Post says the government-run national radio even launched a smear campaign targeting Capriles’ Jewish background.

“Thus began the latest — and what will surely be the ugliest — political campaign by Chávez... [Chavez] is now facing his own homegrown democratic uprising. But Venezuela’s spring differs from those of Libya, Syria or Iran: Instead of pouring into the streets, Venezuelans — fed up with the chaos and violence of Chávez’s 13 years in power — are marching to the polls and trying to restore the country’s crippled and compromised institutions."

The news of Chávez’ ailing health could boost Venezuela’s economy, making it a more attractive place to invest.  Alfredo Viegas, managing director of emerging markets at Knight Capital, told Bloomberg:

“Over the last month Chávez had been out and about and the cancer fears had faded and were less material to prices … The recent news refocused the idea that he might not be around and the market’s conventional wisdom is that a Venezuela post-Chávez could be a much better credit.”

Chavez's Health Concerns Spark Political Uncertainty

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Feb 23, 2012

Chavez's Health Concerns Spark Political Uncertainty

(Image source: Wikimedia Commons)

BY NIELS SCHACK NORGAARD

ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN

 

Hugo Chavez wants to keep his job.  But as the presidential campaign heats up in Venezuela, some doubt whether the Venezuelan strong man’s health is good enough to compete in what commentators call his toughest campaign yet.

CBS reports…

“Chávez says his doctors in Cuba have found a new lesion in his pelvic region, the same place where they removed a tumor last year. He says he will undergo surgery in the coming days.”

According to The Guardian, Mr. Chávez has admitted he would have to scale down his workaholic schedule.  But he faces tough competition from opposition leader Henrique Capriles when the people cast their votes in October. NBC reported earlier this month...

“Official results show Henrique Capriles won 62 percent of the ballot in the country’s first opposition primary vote.”

But he hasn’t gone up against Chávez who has a history of winning national elections since taking power 13 years ago. 

And in an editorial, the Washington Post says the government-run national radio even launched a smear campaign targeting Capriles’ Jewish background.

“Thus began the latest — and what will surely be the ugliest — political campaign by Chávez... [Chavez] is now facing his own homegrown democratic uprising. But Venezuela’s spring differs from those of Libya, Syria or Iran: Instead of pouring into the streets, Venezuelans — fed up with the chaos and violence of Chávez’s 13 years in power — are marching to the polls and trying to restore the country’s crippled and compromised institutions."

The news of Chávez’ ailing health could boost Venezuela’s economy, making it a more attractive place to invest.  Alfredo Viegas, managing director of emerging markets at Knight Capital, told Bloomberg:

“Over the last month Chávez had been out and about and the cancer fears had faded and were less material to prices … The recent news refocused the idea that he might not be around and the market’s conventional wisdom is that a Venezuela post-Chávez could be a much better credit.”

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