Image Source: ABC

BY JIM FLINK

ANCHOR  CANDICE AVILES


The ceasefire in effect between Israel and Hamas is holding for now.  And already, the talk has turned to winners and losers.  Here’s al Jazeera with why that may be the case.

“There is great -- both among journalists and among the public in the United States -- is Middle East fatigue, oh there they go again so what makes it very interesting this time....”
“... there are new players...”


And those new players have been able to effect a change, quickly, in the landscape.
An analyst on Fox News notes, one of them, is the new Egyptian leader, Mohammed Morsi.

“I think it’s a pleasant surprise.  I mean, certainly this is not the government we would have wanted in Egypt, post-Mubarak...”
“But here he is, openly supporting Hamas, but  at the same time brokering a deal that will stop Hamas from firing those rockets...”


Now both sides are claiming victory.
YNet News has the comments of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netenyahu.

"The IDF (Israeli Defense Forces) dealt a heavy blow to Hamas and the other terror groups … Many of the terror leaders were killed and thousands of missiles were destroyed. We are ready to take action if the truce is violated. The goals we have set for the operation were met."

CNN notes, from Hamas’ perspective, it gained leverage and won key concessions from Israel.  And at the same time, it weakened its rival, the more moderate Fatah movement.

“In the eyes of the Palestinian people, the militant leaders took on Israel more boldly than ever before, firing rockets further than ever before, and they may yet manage to get an easing of the Gaza blockade...”

But with more than 160 dead in Gaza, and a half dozen more in Israel, neither side really comes out on top.  In an opinion piece entitled “Enough,” New York Times’ Columnist Roger Cohen says, the problem lies in a continued rhetoric and action that changes nothing, save for lives lost...

“Enough already of competitive victimhood, rival ‘narratives,' absolute claims to all the land and futile killing. Everyone knows, more or less, what the terms for a two-state compromise are. They are not even worth repeating... A limit must be placed, in the name of the living, on the claims of the dead. ... The beginning of the end of conflict is discovering the humanity that lies behind slogans and barriers.”

 

Cease-Fire Holds: Talk Turns to Gaza Winners, Losers

by Jim Flink
0
Sources:FoxYnetCNN
Transcript
Nov 22, 2012

Cease-Fire Holds: Talk Turns to Gaza Winners, Losers

Image Source: ABC

BY JIM FLINK

ANCHOR  CANDICE AVILES


The ceasefire in effect between Israel and Hamas is holding for now.  And already, the talk has turned to winners and losers.  Here’s al Jazeera with why that may be the case.

“There is great -- both among journalists and among the public in the United States -- is Middle East fatigue, oh there they go again so what makes it very interesting this time....”
“... there are new players...”


And those new players have been able to effect a change, quickly, in the landscape.
An analyst on Fox News notes, one of them, is the new Egyptian leader, Mohammed Morsi.

“I think it’s a pleasant surprise.  I mean, certainly this is not the government we would have wanted in Egypt, post-Mubarak...”
“But here he is, openly supporting Hamas, but  at the same time brokering a deal that will stop Hamas from firing those rockets...”


Now both sides are claiming victory.
YNet News has the comments of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netenyahu.

"The IDF (Israeli Defense Forces) dealt a heavy blow to Hamas and the other terror groups … Many of the terror leaders were killed and thousands of missiles were destroyed. We are ready to take action if the truce is violated. The goals we have set for the operation were met."

CNN notes, from Hamas’ perspective, it gained leverage and won key concessions from Israel.  And at the same time, it weakened its rival, the more moderate Fatah movement.

“In the eyes of the Palestinian people, the militant leaders took on Israel more boldly than ever before, firing rockets further than ever before, and they may yet manage to get an easing of the Gaza blockade...”

But with more than 160 dead in Gaza, and a half dozen more in Israel, neither side really comes out on top.  In an opinion piece entitled “Enough,” New York Times’ Columnist Roger Cohen says, the problem lies in a continued rhetoric and action that changes nothing, save for lives lost...

“Enough already of competitive victimhood, rival ‘narratives,' absolute claims to all the land and futile killing. Everyone knows, more or less, what the terms for a two-state compromise are. They are not even worth repeating... A limit must be placed, in the name of the living, on the claims of the dead. ... The beginning of the end of conflict is discovering the humanity that lies behind slogans and barriers.”

 

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