(Image Source: BBC)

BY JOHN O’CONNOR

Sunday marks a crucial election in Catalonia, Spain’s wealthy northeast region. CNN explains.  

“Voters in Spain’s Catalonia region are going to the polls to choose their next president and assembly. The election is seen as indicator of the growing Catalan push for independence.” 

Many Catalans feel Spain’s wider financial troubles are dragging the region down by having them foot the bill for the rest of the country. The Wall Street Journal reports if the region’s ruling party is re-elected, there will be a vote on independence.

“… the elections are likely to set the stage for a prolonged conflict between Catalonia, Spain's top exporting region and highest taxpaying one, and the central government in Madrid. Catalan leader Artur Mas … is hoping that a strong showing Sunday will give him a mandate to call a referendum on independence.” 

The Spanish economy has been struggling with a recession for nearly a year, and the country is heavily indebted at the regional level due to high infrastructure spending coupled with low tax revenues. Al Jazeera reports the region of Catalonia owes the national Spanish government …  

“… a staggering $54 billion. But its leaders say if it breaks away, it’s going to be better placed to pay of its loans because it won’t have to fund a wider Spanish bailout, won’t have to pay for the other lot.”  

Despite a large pro-independence backing in Catalonia and the current ruling party’s promise on a vote for independence, a correspondent for the BBC says it might not be that easy.

“A referendum would be illegal under the Spanish Constitution. It is also far from clear if a majority would vote in favor of Catalonia going it alone and leaving Spain.”  

A poll conducted by the Guardian also shows Artur Mas’s “… party [will] fall 9-11 seats short of an overall majority in the Catalan parliament, meaning he would have to reach deals with smaller parties to hold the referendum he has promised within a four-year mandate.” 

Voting in Catalonia is set to close at 8pm local time, and exit poll results are expected to be released shortly after.

Catalonia Votes in Crucial Election

by John O'Connor
0
Sources:CNNBBC
Transcript
Nov 25, 2012

Catalonia Votes in Crucial Election

 

(Image Source: BBC)

BY JOHN O’CONNOR

Sunday marks a crucial election in Catalonia, Spain’s wealthy northeast region. CNN explains.  

“Voters in Spain’s Catalonia region are going to the polls to choose their next president and assembly. The election is seen as indicator of the growing Catalan push for independence.” 

Many Catalans feel Spain’s wider financial troubles are dragging the region down by having them foot the bill for the rest of the country. The Wall Street Journal reports if the region’s ruling party is re-elected, there will be a vote on independence.

“… the elections are likely to set the stage for a prolonged conflict between Catalonia, Spain's top exporting region and highest taxpaying one, and the central government in Madrid. Catalan leader Artur Mas … is hoping that a strong showing Sunday will give him a mandate to call a referendum on independence.” 

The Spanish economy has been struggling with a recession for nearly a year, and the country is heavily indebted at the regional level due to high infrastructure spending coupled with low tax revenues. Al Jazeera reports the region of Catalonia owes the national Spanish government …  

“… a staggering $54 billion. But its leaders say if it breaks away, it’s going to be better placed to pay of its loans because it won’t have to fund a wider Spanish bailout, won’t have to pay for the other lot.”  

Despite a large pro-independence backing in Catalonia and the current ruling party’s promise on a vote for independence, a correspondent for the BBC says it might not be that easy.

“A referendum would be illegal under the Spanish Constitution. It is also far from clear if a majority would vote in favor of Catalonia going it alone and leaving Spain.”  

A poll conducted by the Guardian also shows Artur Mas’s “… party [will] fall 9-11 seats short of an overall majority in the Catalan parliament, meaning he would have to reach deals with smaller parties to hold the referendum he has promised within a four-year mandate.” 

Voting in Catalonia is set to close at 8pm local time, and exit poll results are expected to be released shortly after.

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