(Image Source: The New York Times)

BY CELIA MURRAY AND CHRISTINA HARTMAN

In response to the drumbeat of critics in recent weeks — British Prime Minister David Cameron and U.S. President Barack Obama say they’re committed to the current Afghanistan troop withdrawal plan.

Cameron is in Washington for talks with President Obama — and the two held a press conference in the White House Rose Garden Wednesday.

CAMERON: “We will not give up on this mission because Afghanistan must never again be a safe haven for Al Qaeda to launch attacks against us.”

Tensions remain high between the U.S. and Afghanistan after a U.S. soldier opened fire in an Afghan village earlier this week — killing 16 civilians. The incident sparked calls from some corners for a faster withdrawal.

And while USA Today’s David Jackson headlines “No change to Afghan Pullout Plan” — The Globe and Mail’s Paul Koring says the two leaders were “Leaving the door ajar for a hurry-up exit...”


President Obama told reporters he doesn’t anticipate making what he called “any sudden changes to the plan” — which would see international forces taking a support role in 2013. Afghanistan is expected to fully take over security in 2014. Fox News calls the plan...

“The opposite of what the American people are saying. In a recent ABC News, Washington Post poll. 60 percent saying it's not worth fighting.”

And Russia’s government-owned RT is also skeptical — quoting a journalist who tells the network — President Obama in particular might be against a hastened withdrawal just to keep up appearances.

“He’s sent over 60,000 additional troops to Afghanistan during his term and if things go south too quickly it would be highly embarrassing to him, and it would be a major point of weakness during his re-election campaign.”

But in their press conference, both leaders emphasized progress made in the country — though they acknowledged what they called the “high cost” of the war. On CNN, Fareed Zakaria says considering recent tensions — sticking to the plan might actually be a good idea.

ZAKARIA: “I also think it would slim the sign of weakness, so it’s very unlikely that under this kind of pressure they would accelerate the withdrawal.”
 

 

Cameron, Obama Affirm Afghan Pullout Plan

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Mar 14, 2012

Cameron, Obama Affirm Afghan Pullout Plan

 

(Image Source: The New York Times)

BY CELIA MURRAY AND CHRISTINA HARTMAN

In response to the drumbeat of critics in recent weeks — British Prime Minister David Cameron and U.S. President Barack Obama say they’re committed to the current Afghanistan troop withdrawal plan.

Cameron is in Washington for talks with President Obama — and the two held a press conference in the White House Rose Garden Wednesday.

CAMERON: “We will not give up on this mission because Afghanistan must never again be a safe haven for Al Qaeda to launch attacks against us.”

Tensions remain high between the U.S. and Afghanistan after a U.S. soldier opened fire in an Afghan village earlier this week — killing 16 civilians. The incident sparked calls from some corners for a faster withdrawal.

And while USA Today’s David Jackson headlines “No change to Afghan Pullout Plan” — The Globe and Mail’s Paul Koring says the two leaders were “Leaving the door ajar for a hurry-up exit...”


President Obama told reporters he doesn’t anticipate making what he called “any sudden changes to the plan” — which would see international forces taking a support role in 2013. Afghanistan is expected to fully take over security in 2014. Fox News calls the plan...

“The opposite of what the American people are saying. In a recent ABC News, Washington Post poll. 60 percent saying it's not worth fighting.”

And Russia’s government-owned RT is also skeptical — quoting a journalist who tells the network — President Obama in particular might be against a hastened withdrawal just to keep up appearances.

“He’s sent over 60,000 additional troops to Afghanistan during his term and if things go south too quickly it would be highly embarrassing to him, and it would be a major point of weakness during his re-election campaign.”

But in their press conference, both leaders emphasized progress made in the country — though they acknowledged what they called the “high cost” of the war. On CNN, Fareed Zakaria says considering recent tensions — sticking to the plan might actually be a good idea.

ZAKARIA: “I also think it would slim the sign of weakness, so it’s very unlikely that under this kind of pressure they would accelerate the withdrawal.”
 

 

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