(Image Source: inquisitr)

BY EVAN THOMAS

ANCHOR NATHAN BYRNE

What do you do after you settle a protracted lawsuit over who invented Facebook? Go into venture capital, apparently. Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss took to CNBC on Friday to explain their plans for the newly founded Winklevoss Capital.

“We’re closing a couple deals hopefully within the month.  Unfortunately we can’t — it’s a little premature to disclose what they are. But we focus on early-stage, disruptive startups.”

The move is raising eyebrows across the web. For one thing, CNET says, the VC world certainly seems easy to get into.

“What, after all, do you do when you have more money than you know what [to do] with and you're just 30 years old? Naturally, you become a venture capitalist. Or, in the case of Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss, just hang out a VC shingle and become Winklevoss Capital.”

Well, you’ve got to start somewhere. TechCrunch points out the twins have as good a grasp of industry buzzwords as anyone else.

“‘We think the cloud is going to be huge,’ Tyler Winklevoss told [CNBC’s] Sorkin today, after all. They’re focusing on ‘early stage disruptive startups’ who are ‘shifting the paradigm.’ I mean, Marc Andreessen, watch your back.”

TechCrunch goes on to temper the sarcasm, and points out if nothing else, the Winklevoss twins are smart and committed. These sort of celebrity investments could give Silicon Valley a new kind of momentum, but The Next Web wonders — where do you draw the line?

“…I don’t think that the fame of Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss is the type of fame someone wants associated with their startup, but I could be wrong. Personally, I’d rather take money from the guy who played them, Armie Hammer.”

The twins didn’t say how much money they were putting into Winklevoss Capital, but it could be a hefty sum — they took equity in Facebook when the lawsuit settled.
 

Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss, Venture Capitalists

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Apr 28, 2012

Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss, Venture Capitalists

(Image Source: inquisitr)

BY EVAN THOMAS

ANCHOR NATHAN BYRNE

What do you do after you settle a protracted lawsuit over who invented Facebook? Go into venture capital, apparently. Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss took to CNBC on Friday to explain their plans for the newly founded Winklevoss Capital.

“We’re closing a couple deals hopefully within the month.  Unfortunately we can’t — it’s a little premature to disclose what they are. But we focus on early-stage, disruptive startups.”

The move is raising eyebrows across the web. For one thing, CNET says, the VC world certainly seems easy to get into.

“What, after all, do you do when you have more money than you know what [to do] with and you're just 30 years old? Naturally, you become a venture capitalist. Or, in the case of Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss, just hang out a VC shingle and become Winklevoss Capital.”

Well, you’ve got to start somewhere. TechCrunch points out the twins have as good a grasp of industry buzzwords as anyone else.

“‘We think the cloud is going to be huge,’ Tyler Winklevoss told [CNBC’s] Sorkin today, after all. They’re focusing on ‘early stage disruptive startups’ who are ‘shifting the paradigm.’ I mean, Marc Andreessen, watch your back.”

TechCrunch goes on to temper the sarcasm, and points out if nothing else, the Winklevoss twins are smart and committed. These sort of celebrity investments could give Silicon Valley a new kind of momentum, but The Next Web wonders — where do you draw the line?

“…I don’t think that the fame of Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss is the type of fame someone wants associated with their startup, but I could be wrong. Personally, I’d rather take money from the guy who played them, Armie Hammer.”

The twins didn’t say how much money they were putting into Winklevoss Capital, but it could be a hefty sum — they took equity in Facebook when the lawsuit settled.
 

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