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"Another effort to tackle California's budget woes.  Legalizing marijuana could soon get a vote.  Proponents behind an initiative to legalize personal marijuana possession and allow regulated sales of pot to adults have enough signatures to put the measure on November's general election ballot." (Fox News)

California made history in 1996 when it became the first state to legalize medical marijuana. The state may set another precedent in November when residents will vote to legalize the recreational use for marijuana for adults.

Under the law, adults 21 and older could possess up to an ounce of marijuana for personal use.

On KTLA, a recreational marijuana advocate says legalizing marijuana has another implication -- boosting California's budget.

"It allows cities and counties to tax and regulate marijuana production and sales.  That means California can generate $1.4 billion per year in revenue."

But a blogger from The Atlantic says taxing marijuana will have an adverse effect on revenue.

"The tax will also raise costs, which should keep some sellers and buyers underground. (Today: drug war for public health and security; tomorrow: drug war to recoup tax dollars."

In an article from Fresno, California's CBS affiliate, a medical marijuana distributor adds a different perspective, saying the measure would impact public safety costs too.

"It would take a big bite out of the black market. It would take money out of the need for law enforcment for that aspect."

This year, New Jersey became the 14th state to follow California's lead and legalize medical marijuana.

A blogger on Alternet says states facing similar budget crises will follow in California's footsteps again.

"This is the best chance for marijuana legalization on a state-level yet...other states could similarly follow it if legalizes cannabis this year. In other words, as goes California, so could go many others."

But on CNN, an opponent of the measure says the health risks far outweigh potential economic benefits.

"Why on Earth would we want to add yet another mind altering substance to the array of legal substances that compromise a person's five senses, where we know they're going to make bad decisions, some criminal."

So what do you think?  Will legalizing marijuana boost California's economy?

 

Writer: Courtney Cebula

Producer: Newsy Staff

Californians to Vote on Legalizing Marijuana

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Mar 26, 2010

Californians to Vote on Legalizing Marijuana

(Thumbnail image: Chicago Now)

 

"Another effort to tackle California's budget woes.  Legalizing marijuana could soon get a vote.  Proponents behind an initiative to legalize personal marijuana possession and allow regulated sales of pot to adults have enough signatures to put the measure on November's general election ballot." (Fox News)

California made history in 1996 when it became the first state to legalize medical marijuana. The state may set another precedent in November when residents will vote to legalize the recreational use for marijuana for adults.

Under the law, adults 21 and older could possess up to an ounce of marijuana for personal use.

On KTLA, a recreational marijuana advocate says legalizing marijuana has another implication -- boosting California's budget.

"It allows cities and counties to tax and regulate marijuana production and sales.  That means California can generate $1.4 billion per year in revenue."

But a blogger from The Atlantic says taxing marijuana will have an adverse effect on revenue.

"The tax will also raise costs, which should keep some sellers and buyers underground. (Today: drug war for public health and security; tomorrow: drug war to recoup tax dollars."

In an article from Fresno, California's CBS affiliate, a medical marijuana distributor adds a different perspective, saying the measure would impact public safety costs too.

"It would take a big bite out of the black market. It would take money out of the need for law enforcment for that aspect."

This year, New Jersey became the 14th state to follow California's lead and legalize medical marijuana.

A blogger on Alternet says states facing similar budget crises will follow in California's footsteps again.

"This is the best chance for marijuana legalization on a state-level yet...other states could similarly follow it if legalizes cannabis this year. In other words, as goes California, so could go many others."

But on CNN, an opponent of the measure says the health risks far outweigh potential economic benefits.

"Why on Earth would we want to add yet another mind altering substance to the array of legal substances that compromise a person's five senses, where we know they're going to make bad decisions, some criminal."

So what do you think?  Will legalizing marijuana boost California's economy?

 

Writer: Courtney Cebula

Producer: Newsy Staff

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