(Image Source: Los Angeles Times)

 

BY JENNIFER LONG

 


Most of Europe is on board with a plan to help solve the Euro Crisis-- but now the UK is saying-- count us out. The Guardian has British Prime Minister David Cameron’s comments.

“I said before coming to Brussels that if I couldn’t get adequate safe guards for Britain in a new European treaty then I wouldn’t agree to it. What is on offer isn’t in Britain’s interest so I didn’t agree to it.”

The agreement would require members to give their budgets to the EU-- which would have the power to ask for changes or punish nations that didn’t balance their budgets.

A writer for the BBC points out--  Britain doesn’t use the euro -- but the success or failure of the currency will still impact the country.

“Most people would say the best deal for the UK last night was more or less any deal that saved the euro. Because if there’s more crisis, let alone a break-up, that could easily sink our recovery for a long time, and cause havoc for Britain’s banks.”

But a writer for The Atlantic Wire points out-- as long as the UK sticks to the pound- it doesn’t have much incentive to fall in line with the EU’s interests.

“The ability to print its own money means that it doesn't need to follow the same strict austerity path that countries like Greece and Italy are being forced down. There's also the matter of the British government allowing the leaders of France and Germany to sign off on its own internal politics, a notion most Brits find unacceptable.”

But a reporter for The Guardian notes-- if the UK pulls away from a deal many EU countries are on board with-- it will lose its influence in the group.

“...increasingly Germany and France will be left to call the shots. There is only one direction of travel for British Eurosceptics. They can pull Britain further away from the core Europe that is being created, but they can not simultaneously exert more influence over it.”

Finally--  a blogger for the Telegraph says-- Cameron may be pulling the UK away from the EU-- but right now-- that’s a good thing.

“If ‘isolated' means staying well clear of the clumsy and ultimately undemocratic eurozone project, that’s a damn good place to be.”

For now-- Sweden, Hungary and the Czech Republic have also refused to sign on to the deal.

Britain Opts Out of EU Crisis Plan

by Nathan Giannini
0
Transcript
Dec 9, 2011

Britain Opts Out of EU Crisis Plan

(Image Source: Los Angeles Times)

 

BY JENNIFER LONG

 


Most of Europe is on board with a plan to help solve the Euro Crisis-- but now the UK is saying-- count us out. The Guardian has British Prime Minister David Cameron’s comments.

“I said before coming to Brussels that if I couldn’t get adequate safe guards for Britain in a new European treaty then I wouldn’t agree to it. What is on offer isn’t in Britain’s interest so I didn’t agree to it.”

The agreement would require members to give their budgets to the EU-- which would have the power to ask for changes or punish nations that didn’t balance their budgets.

A writer for the BBC points out--  Britain doesn’t use the euro -- but the success or failure of the currency will still impact the country.

“Most people would say the best deal for the UK last night was more or less any deal that saved the euro. Because if there’s more crisis, let alone a break-up, that could easily sink our recovery for a long time, and cause havoc for Britain’s banks.”

But a writer for The Atlantic Wire points out-- as long as the UK sticks to the pound- it doesn’t have much incentive to fall in line with the EU’s interests.

“The ability to print its own money means that it doesn't need to follow the same strict austerity path that countries like Greece and Italy are being forced down. There's also the matter of the British government allowing the leaders of France and Germany to sign off on its own internal politics, a notion most Brits find unacceptable.”

But a reporter for The Guardian notes-- if the UK pulls away from a deal many EU countries are on board with-- it will lose its influence in the group.

“...increasingly Germany and France will be left to call the shots. There is only one direction of travel for British Eurosceptics. They can pull Britain further away from the core Europe that is being created, but they can not simultaneously exert more influence over it.”

Finally--  a blogger for the Telegraph says-- Cameron may be pulling the UK away from the EU-- but right now-- that’s a good thing.

“If ‘isolated' means staying well clear of the clumsy and ultimately undemocratic eurozone project, that’s a damn good place to be.”

For now-- Sweden, Hungary and the Czech Republic have also refused to sign on to the deal.

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