Image Source: Daily Mail

BY ROBERT ABEL
ANCHOR CANDICE AVILES



Anders Behring Breivik, the Norwegian man convicted for killing 77 people in 2011, says his treatment in prison violates both his rights and the UN Torture Convention.

In a letter to prison officials, Breivik complained of numerous strip searches, a lack of social interaction and computer access, and even his undecorated prison cell.

In addition, Breivik’s lawyer Tord Jordet told BBC World News.

“He’s not allowed to send any letters which touches any political issues or these with his hopes for the future of Europe. And we will also state that that has been the subject of inhumane and degrading treatment.”

There’s a reason he’s not allowed to send letters. The Daily Mail reports a Norwegian newspaper exposed letters he sent to a high ranking right-wing extremist.

“The letters asked for help to ‘continue the fight’ and establish a new extremist network he called the Conservative Revolutionary Movement.”

Other complaints were that he was served cold coffee and he’s allowed to use skin moisturizer. But it’s not likely to garner a lot of sympathy. One of the survivors from Breivik’s attack on the Island of Utoya told Norwegian newspaper Verdens Gang:

“...Anders Behring Breivik will never be anything but the coldblooded child-murderer and assassin who took nearly 80 human lives...There are a lot of other countries who would have treated someone who has committed the crimes he has completely different.”


Breivik says he’s held in complete isolation 23 hours a day. BBC News reported the conditions of his cell, which...

“...includes three sections, one to sleep, one for study and a third for exercise - each measuring 8 sq m (86 sq ft)....it differs markedly from other maximum security jails in western Europe. The staff is a half-and-half mix of men and women and none are armed.”

Breivik’s actual sentence was a 10 year minimum, 21 year maximum.

Jo Stigen, a law professor at the University of Oslo, told NBCNews.com that Breivik was unlikely to be released for decades.

The Norwegian Prison Authorities have yet to comment on the letter.

 

Breivik Complains Prison Conditions Violate Human Rights

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Nov 10, 2012

Breivik Complains Prison Conditions Violate Human Rights

Image Source: Daily Mail

BY ROBERT ABEL
ANCHOR CANDICE AVILES



Anders Behring Breivik, the Norwegian man convicted for killing 77 people in 2011, says his treatment in prison violates both his rights and the UN Torture Convention.

In a letter to prison officials, Breivik complained of numerous strip searches, a lack of social interaction and computer access, and even his undecorated prison cell.

In addition, Breivik’s lawyer Tord Jordet told BBC World News.

“He’s not allowed to send any letters which touches any political issues or these with his hopes for the future of Europe. And we will also state that that has been the subject of inhumane and degrading treatment.”

There’s a reason he’s not allowed to send letters. The Daily Mail reports a Norwegian newspaper exposed letters he sent to a high ranking right-wing extremist.

“The letters asked for help to ‘continue the fight’ and establish a new extremist network he called the Conservative Revolutionary Movement.”

Other complaints were that he was served cold coffee and he’s allowed to use skin moisturizer. But it’s not likely to garner a lot of sympathy. One of the survivors from Breivik’s attack on the Island of Utoya told Norwegian newspaper Verdens Gang:

“...Anders Behring Breivik will never be anything but the coldblooded child-murderer and assassin who took nearly 80 human lives...There are a lot of other countries who would have treated someone who has committed the crimes he has completely different.”


Breivik says he’s held in complete isolation 23 hours a day. BBC News reported the conditions of his cell, which...

“...includes three sections, one to sleep, one for study and a third for exercise - each measuring 8 sq m (86 sq ft)....it differs markedly from other maximum security jails in western Europe. The staff is a half-and-half mix of men and women and none are armed.”

Breivik’s actual sentence was a 10 year minimum, 21 year maximum.

Jo Stigen, a law professor at the University of Oslo, told NBCNews.com that Breivik was unlikely to be released for decades.

The Norwegian Prison Authorities have yet to comment on the letter.

 

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