Image Source: United States Army


BY: NICHOLE CARTMELL

Suspected of leaking government documents, Bradley Manning has been in jail for more than 2 years and could face life in prison for his alleged involvement in the Wikileaks scandal... But he is now looking to take responsibility for some of his actions. Here’s CNN with the details.

“The army private accused of leaking millions of government documents to the controversial wikileaks website while serving in Iraq is now offering to plead guilty to some of the charges against him.”

According to the BBC, Manning’s lawyer, David Coombs, made the plea bargain at a pretrial hearing on Wednesday. This is the first time Manning has ever made an offer alluding to his involvement in Wikileaks. The BBC says...

“The offer is the first sign he will admit leaking secret Afghanistan and Iraq war reports and diplomatic cables. But it suggests he will not plead guilty to aiding enemies of the US (identified by prosecutors as al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula), violating federal espionage and computer laws - charges for which he could face life in prison if found guilty.”

Forbes explains Manning is taking responsibility for leaking at least a subset of a collection of classified documents. This includes thousands of files about the Afghanistan and Iraq Wars, secret memos from the State Department and the video of a U.S. Apache helicopter firing on journalists and civilians in Baghdad.

A blogger for the website FireDogLake says if the plea is accepted the government would have to choose how to proceed. But if approved the guilty plea could have an affect on Manning’s sentencing and trial.

“... the lesser included offenses would likely come with a less severe punishment (although the charge of “aiding the enemy”... would still be in play. What this does for the trial... is it cuts back on the physical evidence and the witnesses that the government may need to call to make a case. It also cuts back on the arguments that would need to be made.”

The BBC reports Manning has also requested to be tried by a military judge alone, instead of a judge and a panel of military officers. He is set to take trial in early February.

Bradley Manning Admits Wikileaks Involvement

by Nichole Cartmell
0
Transcript
Nov 9, 2012

Bradley Manning Admits Wikileaks Involvement

Image Source: United States Army


BY: NICHOLE CARTMELL

Suspected of leaking government documents, Bradley Manning has been in jail for more than 2 years and could face life in prison for his alleged involvement in the Wikileaks scandal... But he is now looking to take responsibility for some of his actions. Here’s CNN with the details.

“The army private accused of leaking millions of government documents to the controversial wikileaks website while serving in Iraq is now offering to plead guilty to some of the charges against him.”

According to the BBC, Manning’s lawyer, David Coombs, made the plea bargain at a pretrial hearing on Wednesday. This is the first time Manning has ever made an offer alluding to his involvement in Wikileaks. The BBC says...

“The offer is the first sign he will admit leaking secret Afghanistan and Iraq war reports and diplomatic cables. But it suggests he will not plead guilty to aiding enemies of the US (identified by prosecutors as al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula), violating federal espionage and computer laws - charges for which he could face life in prison if found guilty.”

Forbes explains Manning is taking responsibility for leaking at least a subset of a collection of classified documents. This includes thousands of files about the Afghanistan and Iraq Wars, secret memos from the State Department and the video of a U.S. Apache helicopter firing on journalists and civilians in Baghdad.

A blogger for the website FireDogLake says if the plea is accepted the government would have to choose how to proceed. But if approved the guilty plea could have an affect on Manning’s sentencing and trial.

“... the lesser included offenses would likely come with a less severe punishment (although the charge of “aiding the enemy”... would still be in play. What this does for the trial... is it cuts back on the physical evidence and the witnesses that the government may need to call to make a case. It also cuts back on the arguments that would need to be made.”

The BBC reports Manning has also requested to be tried by a military judge alone, instead of a judge and a panel of military officers. He is set to take trial in early February.

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