(Image Source: Wikimedia Commons)

 

BY JIM FLINK

ANCHOR LAUREN GORES


A murder mystery. A corruption probe. Now, the entire Chinese communist party appears to be under the microscope in the Bo Xilai investigation. Here’s NTDTV with details.

“Communist official Bo Xilai has come under media scrutiny, as an official murder investigation continues into the death of British citizen Neil Heywood. Bo’s wife is the primary suspect.”

The motive for murder? Media reports say, Bo’s wife — Gu KaiLai — believed Heywood was about to blow the lid off a secret financial empire she had built overseas.
 

Bloomberg reports on the breadth of that network.

“The sisters of Gu Kailai … controlled a web of businesses from Beijing to Hong Kong to the Caribbean worth at least $126 million, regulatory and corporate filings show. Their wealth — and the fact they put some assets offshore where ownership is harder to trace — illustrate how the politically connected thrive in China …”

The Wall Street Journal says, those political connections — tied to wealth — threaten to undo what it calls The Chinese Myth. The idea that China is not an emerging economy, but a bundled mess of insider dealing and corruption, run by party leaders who treat the nation’s banks as their own.

“Mr. Bo ran Chongqing like a fiefdom for his personal gain. So do most other city bosses in China. Mr. Bo is a ‘princeling’ son of Maoist royalty... Mr. Bo's son drives a Ferrari. So do many other children of top party officials, who presumably cannot afford $200,000 cars on their modest government allowances.”

But the BBC wonders if truth is the casualty here. Bo Xilai was a famed anti-crime crusader — fighting the very corruption with which he is now charged. Is it possible, the BBC asks, if he is actually a victim in the run-up to the Communist Party’s congress?

“Bo Xilai was a charismatic and popular politician who many expected would be promoted at this party gathering. He appears to be a victim of the factional in-fighting in the lead-up to the congress. What he did, how he is linked to the death of Neil Heywood and why he was sacked are still unanswered questions."

And CBS news notes, because of the scandal, the Chinese leadership finds itself at a crossroads.

“This case of alleged corruption and murder is now seen as one thing more. A sign that China’s top leadership may be in trouble.”

“Is Bo Xilai the dark underside of a party where the privileged elite can abuse power at will?”


The New Yorker says, the Chinese people can no longer ignore the revelations coming out of this trial, and what it means for the larger society.

“... there is a difference between knowing it exists in the abstract and confronting the cold, blunt accounting—seeing the cars and tuition it buys, realizing the land that was seized to pay for it, and working out how those funds might have been used for better health care or education.”

But a writer for the Chinese state-run Xinhua media says, the party will handle this investigation in the way it has handled all past investigations — and will thrive.

“... an investigation into serious discipline violations by Bo Xilai have caused some from overseas to speculate about China's future ... looking back at the trajectory of China's development, its current situation and future prospects for development, observers will find that similar individual incidents have not and will not impede China's development.”
 

Bo Xilai Case Thickens, Murder Coverup Alleged

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Apr 17, 2012

Bo Xilai Case Thickens, Murder Coverup Alleged

(Image Source: Wikimedia Commons)

 

BY JIM FLINK

ANCHOR LAUREN GORES


A murder mystery. A corruption probe. Now, the entire Chinese communist party appears to be under the microscope in the Bo Xilai investigation. Here’s NTDTV with details.

“Communist official Bo Xilai has come under media scrutiny, as an official murder investigation continues into the death of British citizen Neil Heywood. Bo’s wife is the primary suspect.”

The motive for murder? Media reports say, Bo’s wife — Gu KaiLai — believed Heywood was about to blow the lid off a secret financial empire she had built overseas.
 

Bloomberg reports on the breadth of that network.

“The sisters of Gu Kailai … controlled a web of businesses from Beijing to Hong Kong to the Caribbean worth at least $126 million, regulatory and corporate filings show. Their wealth — and the fact they put some assets offshore where ownership is harder to trace — illustrate how the politically connected thrive in China …”

The Wall Street Journal says, those political connections — tied to wealth — threaten to undo what it calls The Chinese Myth. The idea that China is not an emerging economy, but a bundled mess of insider dealing and corruption, run by party leaders who treat the nation’s banks as their own.

“Mr. Bo ran Chongqing like a fiefdom for his personal gain. So do most other city bosses in China. Mr. Bo is a ‘princeling’ son of Maoist royalty... Mr. Bo's son drives a Ferrari. So do many other children of top party officials, who presumably cannot afford $200,000 cars on their modest government allowances.”

But the BBC wonders if truth is the casualty here. Bo Xilai was a famed anti-crime crusader — fighting the very corruption with which he is now charged. Is it possible, the BBC asks, if he is actually a victim in the run-up to the Communist Party’s congress?

“Bo Xilai was a charismatic and popular politician who many expected would be promoted at this party gathering. He appears to be a victim of the factional in-fighting in the lead-up to the congress. What he did, how he is linked to the death of Neil Heywood and why he was sacked are still unanswered questions."

And CBS news notes, because of the scandal, the Chinese leadership finds itself at a crossroads.

“This case of alleged corruption and murder is now seen as one thing more. A sign that China’s top leadership may be in trouble.”

“Is Bo Xilai the dark underside of a party where the privileged elite can abuse power at will?”


The New Yorker says, the Chinese people can no longer ignore the revelations coming out of this trial, and what it means for the larger society.

“... there is a difference between knowing it exists in the abstract and confronting the cold, blunt accounting—seeing the cars and tuition it buys, realizing the land that was seized to pay for it, and working out how those funds might have been used for better health care or education.”

But a writer for the Chinese state-run Xinhua media says, the party will handle this investigation in the way it has handled all past investigations — and will thrive.

“... an investigation into serious discipline violations by Bo Xilai have caused some from overseas to speculate about China's future ... looking back at the trajectory of China's development, its current situation and future prospects for development, observers will find that similar individual incidents have not and will not impede China's development.”
 

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