(Image Source: New York Times

BY LYNDSEY GARZA

ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN

 

New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg delivered a speech to a Brooklyn church today defending the city’s
controversial stop-and-frisk policy, but also says it could be “mended.” Bloomberg emphasized so far 2012 has seen the lowest number of murders on record in the city’s history since the policy went in effect. New York 1 has the mayor’s defense...  

“I understand why some people are calling for the stops to be eliminated entirely, but there's no denying that the stops take guns off the streets and save lives.”

Bloomberg was speaking to a predominantly-African American congregation. Opponents of the “stop-and-frisk” policy say the controversial policy disproportionately targets minorities. The New York Civil Liberties Union says 42% of all people stopped last year were comprised of young black and Latino men. A silent march in protest of the stop-and-frisk policy is planned for Father’s Day, June 17. The gathering will also commemorate the march on June 17, 1927 against lynching. On MSNBC, Reverend Al Sharpton says...

“If you’re young, black, look a certain way... If you have a certain hairstyle, you will be frisked in New York. If you look at the data, it's almost impossible, if you are young, black and Latino, not to be stopped in New York.”

In May, a judge granted permission to a class-action status lawsuit to challenge the policy. The Justice Department is now reviewing the case. A blogger for Village Voice says reform to the policy will require reforming the NYPD and implementing a system of transparency that monitors officers behavior...

“It's a matter of authority-civilian relations, where the police view ordinary citizens of color as potential criminals. And we agree with the Mayor: that is something that needs to be changed...”

In fact, The Washington Post’s editorial board came up with a potential solution, borrowing from a measured recently proposed in France.

“The policy would require officers to issue receipts that include their own identification to those they stop. Police might think twice about why they select certain people, and treat those they do stop with more respect. … The practice could tilt the balance of power a tad, restoring some dignity to innocent citizens without infringing on police power.”

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo recently proposed a measure that would decriminalize small amounts of marijuana in public. Mayor Bloomberg threw his support behind the plan, and supporters say it could cut down on stop-and-frisk incidents. 

Bloomberg Defends 'Stop-and-Frisk' to Brooklyn Church

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Jun 11, 2012

Bloomberg Defends 'Stop-and-Frisk' to Brooklyn Church

(Image Source: New York Times

BY LYNDSEY GARZA

ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN

 

New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg delivered a speech to a Brooklyn church today defending the city’s
controversial stop-and-frisk policy, but also says it could be “mended.” Bloomberg emphasized so far 2012 has seen the lowest number of murders on record in the city’s history since the policy went in effect. New York 1 has the mayor’s defense...  

“I understand why some people are calling for the stops to be eliminated entirely, but there's no denying that the stops take guns off the streets and save lives.”

Bloomberg was speaking to a predominantly-African American congregation. Opponents of the “stop-and-frisk” policy say the controversial policy disproportionately targets minorities. The New York Civil Liberties Union says 42% of all people stopped last year were comprised of young black and Latino men. A silent march in protest of the stop-and-frisk policy is planned for Father’s Day, June 17. The gathering will also commemorate the march on June 17, 1927 against lynching. On MSNBC, Reverend Al Sharpton says...

“If you’re young, black, look a certain way... If you have a certain hairstyle, you will be frisked in New York. If you look at the data, it's almost impossible, if you are young, black and Latino, not to be stopped in New York.”

In May, a judge granted permission to a class-action status lawsuit to challenge the policy. The Justice Department is now reviewing the case. A blogger for Village Voice says reform to the policy will require reforming the NYPD and implementing a system of transparency that monitors officers behavior...

“It's a matter of authority-civilian relations, where the police view ordinary citizens of color as potential criminals. And we agree with the Mayor: that is something that needs to be changed...”

In fact, The Washington Post’s editorial board came up with a potential solution, borrowing from a measured recently proposed in France.

“The policy would require officers to issue receipts that include their own identification to those they stop. Police might think twice about why they select certain people, and treat those they do stop with more respect. … The practice could tilt the balance of power a tad, restoring some dignity to innocent citizens without infringing on police power.”

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo recently proposed a measure that would decriminalize small amounts of marijuana in public. Mayor Bloomberg threw his support behind the plan, and supporters say it could cut down on stop-and-frisk incidents. 

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