(Thumbnail Image: Fastcompany)

 

Bloom Box--some call it the holy grail of energy. After 9 years, engineers unveiled a fuel-cell generator that could revolutionize the world's energy market.

 

"Bloom's fuel cell works like this. Oxygen is pumped in on one side, natural gas on the other. The two combine inside the cell to create a chemical reaction that produces electricity. No burning, no combustion, no power lines from outside." (CBS News)

Bloom Energy promises cheaper and more efficient energy.  Many consumers and critics feel it's a product that will work and sell. Others question the feasibility of the new energy source.

We're looking at perspectives from ABC, Fox Business, MSNBC, and PC World.

Good Morning America focuses on how green Bloom Box can be.

 

Reporter: "A stack like this one can create enough energy to power a 5,000 square foot home. And since there's no combustion involved, Bloom Boxes produce less than half the emissions than traditional gas burning systems."

 

Creator: "Fuel goes in, electricity comes out, and you don't get obnoxious fumes, you don't get sulfur, you don't get any of that stuff."

 

But FOX Business is skeptical of Bloom and points out the mechanical limitations of the box.


Guest 1: "It's very expensive to install, right, and then they burn out very quickly too."

 

Clayton Morris - "That's a great point, and you have to have professional engineers come out to your house."

 

Guest 2: "Union engineers, I'm sure."

 

Clayton Morris - "Probably, and only after about two years of service. So you have these things for about two years, they burn out, a professional engineer has to come out to your house and put in new ones."

 

MSNBC sat down with CNET's Brian Cooley who highlights how Bloom Box could save consumers money in a big way.

 

Brian Cooley: "They're saying it'll power at eight to 10 cents a kilowatt hour. For folks who don't follow the game, that's very cheap electricity. Not crazy cheap, but very inexpensive.

 

Dylan Ratigan: How much does a typical kilowatt cost?

 

Brian Cooley: It could be more like 15 to 18 cents in expensive states. So you're cutting the price way down and it's a flex fuel like you say. You can kind of find any gas to go in there.

 

PC World reports numerous companies have tried inventions like this in the past.

"There are probably another 100 companies that are working on something very similar."

 

"The potential exists for a competitor to introduce an even more attractive system than Bloom, which was founded in 2001 and spent nine years developing its server."

So do you think the Bloom Box will be a game changer? 

Writer: Tyler Goetz

Producer: Newsy Staff

Bloom Box Promises Cheaper and Greener Energy

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Feb 28, 2010

Bloom Box Promises Cheaper and Greener Energy

(Thumbnail Image: Fastcompany)

 

Bloom Box--some call it the holy grail of energy. After 9 years, engineers unveiled a fuel-cell generator that could revolutionize the world's energy market.

 

"Bloom's fuel cell works like this. Oxygen is pumped in on one side, natural gas on the other. The two combine inside the cell to create a chemical reaction that produces electricity. No burning, no combustion, no power lines from outside." (CBS News)

Bloom Energy promises cheaper and more efficient energy.  Many consumers and critics feel it's a product that will work and sell. Others question the feasibility of the new energy source.

We're looking at perspectives from ABC, Fox Business, MSNBC, and PC World.

Good Morning America focuses on how green Bloom Box can be.

 

Reporter: "A stack like this one can create enough energy to power a 5,000 square foot home. And since there's no combustion involved, Bloom Boxes produce less than half the emissions than traditional gas burning systems."

 

Creator: "Fuel goes in, electricity comes out, and you don't get obnoxious fumes, you don't get sulfur, you don't get any of that stuff."

 

But FOX Business is skeptical of Bloom and points out the mechanical limitations of the box.


Guest 1: "It's very expensive to install, right, and then they burn out very quickly too."

 

Clayton Morris - "That's a great point, and you have to have professional engineers come out to your house."

 

Guest 2: "Union engineers, I'm sure."

 

Clayton Morris - "Probably, and only after about two years of service. So you have these things for about two years, they burn out, a professional engineer has to come out to your house and put in new ones."

 

MSNBC sat down with CNET's Brian Cooley who highlights how Bloom Box could save consumers money in a big way.

 

Brian Cooley: "They're saying it'll power at eight to 10 cents a kilowatt hour. For folks who don't follow the game, that's very cheap electricity. Not crazy cheap, but very inexpensive.

 

Dylan Ratigan: How much does a typical kilowatt cost?

 

Brian Cooley: It could be more like 15 to 18 cents in expensive states. So you're cutting the price way down and it's a flex fuel like you say. You can kind of find any gas to go in there.

 

PC World reports numerous companies have tried inventions like this in the past.

"There are probably another 100 companies that are working on something very similar."

 

"The potential exists for a competitor to introduce an even more attractive system than Bloom, which was founded in 2001 and spent nine years developing its server."

So do you think the Bloom Box will be a game changer? 

Writer: Tyler Goetz

Producer: Newsy Staff

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