(Image Source: National Park Service)
 


BY MICHELLE SCHUELKE



Bison roaming outside of Yellowstone National Park are reportedly targets for many hunters this year.


Roughly 250 bison have been killed this season after leaving Yellowstone mostly by American Indian tribes who have a treaty with the state to hunt the bison. (Via KRTV)


So what’s the problem? Hunters are not allowed in Yellowstone, so administrators rely on the killing of animals once they migrate to Montana. With a population of more than 4,000 bison, officials set a target of removing 400 this year.


KBZK reports Montana lawmakers are proposing ten bills “...creating a statewide bison hunting season, to a bill which allows landowners to kill bison if they trespass onto private property.” (Via KBZK)


Republican’s in Montana supporting the bills say bison need to be fenced into Yellowstone and released at specific times to control populations.


The buffalo created all kinds of things for living for the tribes years and years ago... But we’re in modern America today, free roaming buffalo absolutely will not work.” (Via KTVQ)


KBGF reports the issue might not be that simple. “Tribal leaders say hunting wild bison goes against some American Indian religious beliefs. Proponents of the bill say bison and their coexistence with the livestock is a problem in the state.” (Via KBGF)


The National Park Service claims bison were exposed to a bacteria over a century ago that can affect livestock and that is what is scaring off some residence from allowing free roaming bison.


Bison require special attention because many have been exposed to the bacteria that causes brucellosis, a disease that also infects domestic cattle. Yellowstone has worked with the state of Montana and other federal agencies to develop a plan for managing the bison population in a way that protects both its wild and free-roaming characteristics and the health of Montana cattle.”


Moving bison to reserves or shipping them somewhere for slaughtering to control numbers would violate the agreements with the American Indians. They argue it would violate their rights by removing animals that hunters otherwise could harvest.

 

Bison Leaving Yellowstone are Targets for Hunting

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Mar 23, 2013

Bison Leaving Yellowstone are Targets for Hunting

 

(Image Source: National Park Service)
 


BY MICHELLE SCHUELKE



Bison roaming outside of Yellowstone National Park are reportedly targets for many hunters this year.


Roughly 250 bison have been killed this season after leaving Yellowstone mostly by American Indian tribes who have a treaty with the state to hunt the bison. (Via KRTV)


So what’s the problem? Hunters are not allowed in Yellowstone, so administrators rely on the killing of animals once they migrate to Montana. With a population of more than 4,000 bison, officials set a target of removing 400 this year.


KBZK reports Montana lawmakers are proposing ten bills “...creating a statewide bison hunting season, to a bill which allows landowners to kill bison if they trespass onto private property.” (Via KBZK)


Republican’s in Montana supporting the bills say bison need to be fenced into Yellowstone and released at specific times to control populations.


The buffalo created all kinds of things for living for the tribes years and years ago... But we’re in modern America today, free roaming buffalo absolutely will not work.” (Via KTVQ)


KBGF reports the issue might not be that simple. “Tribal leaders say hunting wild bison goes against some American Indian religious beliefs. Proponents of the bill say bison and their coexistence with the livestock is a problem in the state.” (Via KBGF)


The National Park Service claims bison were exposed to a bacteria over a century ago that can affect livestock and that is what is scaring off some residence from allowing free roaming bison.


Bison require special attention because many have been exposed to the bacteria that causes brucellosis, a disease that also infects domestic cattle. Yellowstone has worked with the state of Montana and other federal agencies to develop a plan for managing the bison population in a way that protects both its wild and free-roaming characteristics and the health of Montana cattle.”


Moving bison to reserves or shipping them somewhere for slaughtering to control numbers would violate the agreements with the American Indians. They argue it would violate their rights by removing animals that hunters otherwise could harvest.

 
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