(Thumbnail image from White House photographer Pete Souza)

“So many of us are here today as a recognition that the threat from climate change is serious; it is urgent and it is growing.” (CNBC)
 
US President Barack Obama faces what looks to be his biggest week ever on the international stage. Apart from speaking at the UN Climate Change Summit, he also chairs the UN Security Council meeting, hosts the G-20 summit, and launches three-way Middle East talks with Israel and Palestine, among other issues. Several media sources are critical of the President's ability to live up to expectations, while others applaud his ambitious plans. (Video: NECN)

We take a look at perspectives from ABC News, The Christian Science Monitor, CBS News, France24, Russia Today and The Independent.
 
An author on ABC News says both the US and the rest of the world are asking too much of Obama.
 
“Well, the expectations of the President domestically as well as internationally are almost off the charts.”
 
Because of that, a writer from The Christian Science Monitor says leaders in Europe are doubtful Obama can meet expectations, specifically on climate change.
 
“Even with a change in administrations in Washington and consequently a more aggressive effort to deal with the issue, some European officials have questioned the US’s determination to tackle climate change.”

Obama is also embarking on a Presidential first, chairing a session of the UN Security Council.  While many critics say the President should not be seen sitting at the same table as some of the world's most notorious dictators and trouble-makers, a writer from CBS News shares a more optimistic view.

“He is expected to be received with open arms by a diplomatic corps, which sees him as an agent of change in U.S. policy from confrontation to negotiation. It sounds like he may even receive a standing ovation from the 120 heads of state and government.”
 
With regards to the Middle-East peace process, a France24 reporter in Jerusalem says these talks likely won't make much of a difference.
 
“In any case, there is a lot of cynicism at this end, both among Israelis and Palestinians that this might amount to nothing more than just a photo-opportunity for these leaders.”
 
Russia Today talks to a professor who says Obama knows he won't accomplish much, but he says the President is still doing something just by trying.
 
“I don’t think that the Americans are under an illusion, that if... that even if... if the Israeli-Palestinian conflict would be solved, many other tensions in the Middle East will be solved. But it gives the impression of relative stability, and images are sometimes important.”
 
A writer for UK’s The Independent sees this week as a tough test for Obama’s diplomatic image.  Biting off such monumental issues as world peace, climate change, and the international recession all in one week, can lead to accusations of more lip service, than strategic action.  
 
“Mr. Obama will come to the meetings more naked than he would like. The gap between ambitions and reality will be obvious at the climate change talks... And in Pittsburgh, where the focus of the G20 talks will be the still-fragile state of the world economy, Mr. Obama will face criticism that his words have not been matched by action.”

Media sources question if Obama is biting off more than he can chew. We want to know what you think.

Big Week for Obama

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Transcript
Sep 24, 2009

Big Week for Obama

(Thumbnail image from White House photographer Pete Souza)

“So many of us are here today as a recognition that the threat from climate change is serious; it is urgent and it is growing.” (CNBC)
 
US President Barack Obama faces what looks to be his biggest week ever on the international stage. Apart from speaking at the UN Climate Change Summit, he also chairs the UN Security Council meeting, hosts the G-20 summit, and launches three-way Middle East talks with Israel and Palestine, among other issues. Several media sources are critical of the President's ability to live up to expectations, while others applaud his ambitious plans. (Video: NECN)

We take a look at perspectives from ABC News, The Christian Science Monitor, CBS News, France24, Russia Today and The Independent.
 
An author on ABC News says both the US and the rest of the world are asking too much of Obama.
 
“Well, the expectations of the President domestically as well as internationally are almost off the charts.”
 
Because of that, a writer from The Christian Science Monitor says leaders in Europe are doubtful Obama can meet expectations, specifically on climate change.
 
“Even with a change in administrations in Washington and consequently a more aggressive effort to deal with the issue, some European officials have questioned the US’s determination to tackle climate change.”

Obama is also embarking on a Presidential first, chairing a session of the UN Security Council.  While many critics say the President should not be seen sitting at the same table as some of the world's most notorious dictators and trouble-makers, a writer from CBS News shares a more optimistic view.

“He is expected to be received with open arms by a diplomatic corps, which sees him as an agent of change in U.S. policy from confrontation to negotiation. It sounds like he may even receive a standing ovation from the 120 heads of state and government.”
 
With regards to the Middle-East peace process, a France24 reporter in Jerusalem says these talks likely won't make much of a difference.
 
“In any case, there is a lot of cynicism at this end, both among Israelis and Palestinians that this might amount to nothing more than just a photo-opportunity for these leaders.”
 
Russia Today talks to a professor who says Obama knows he won't accomplish much, but he says the President is still doing something just by trying.
 
“I don’t think that the Americans are under an illusion, that if... that even if... if the Israeli-Palestinian conflict would be solved, many other tensions in the Middle East will be solved. But it gives the impression of relative stability, and images are sometimes important.”
 
A writer for UK’s The Independent sees this week as a tough test for Obama’s diplomatic image.  Biting off such monumental issues as world peace, climate change, and the international recession all in one week, can lead to accusations of more lip service, than strategic action.  
 
“Mr. Obama will come to the meetings more naked than he would like. The gap between ambitions and reality will be obvious at the climate change talks... And in Pittsburgh, where the focus of the G20 talks will be the still-fragile state of the world economy, Mr. Obama will face criticism that his words have not been matched by action.”

Media sources question if Obama is biting off more than he can chew. We want to know what you think.

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