(Image Source: New York Times)

BY DAN KENNEDY
ANCHOR NATHAN BYRNE

Voters for the Baseball Hall of Fame threw players and fans a curveball Wednesday. For the first time since 1996, the baseball writers rejected every eligible player membership into the prestigious club.

“Among those shut out were all-time home run leader Barry Bonds, and seven-time Cy Young winner Roger Clemens, too. Not one of the 37 players even got in.”


Another year, another no-go for some of baseball’s biggest stars of the steroid era. Roger Clemens and Barry Bonds are still shy of the necessary 75 to get in. And Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa’s recent percentages don’t look promising for any future in the Hall of Fame. And ESPN’s Tony Kornheiser says their absence is a shame.

“And someday maybe there will be a revision of theory on this. But if you look at the voters now, they didn’t just say thumbs down, they said get out! Get out! And I can’t imagine the Hall of Fame without these guys.”

MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough says keep ‘em out of Cooperstown.

“I don’t want Barry Bonds, that felon, that creep to be in the same state with Hank Aaron.”

It wasn’t just the biggest names of the steroid era denied entry. Player Craig Biggio came closest but was 39 votes shy. Tigers great Jack Morris was a close second but only has one more year left of eligibility. And Mike Piazza -- the greatest hitting catcher in history -- only received 57% of the vote.

The snub of those players suggests voters won’t accept anyone with even a whisper of steroid use. And a writer for WTVJ calls that an unfair standard.

“And if it continues to be applied haphazardly, it will permanently stain something that’s supposed to be a celebration of baseball.”

According to the New York Times, this marks the first time since 1960 that the induction ceremony won’t include any new, living honorees. And former player Pete Rose says that could have a negative economic impact.

“We have a lot of friends in Cooperstown who own stores and they kind of thrive on that week, Hall of Fame week, to survive for the year. I don’t know what kind of induction week it’s going to be now because there’s no induction.”

Voters take into consideration a candidate’s integrity, sportsmanship, character, and playing record.

 

 

Baseball's Steroid Era Players, Everyone Else, Whiff on HOF

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Jan 10, 2013

Baseball's Steroid Era Players, Everyone Else, Whiff on HOF

(Image Source: New York Times)

BY DAN KENNEDY
ANCHOR NATHAN BYRNE

Voters for the Baseball Hall of Fame threw players and fans a curveball Wednesday. For the first time since 1996, the baseball writers rejected every eligible player membership into the prestigious club.

“Among those shut out were all-time home run leader Barry Bonds, and seven-time Cy Young winner Roger Clemens, too. Not one of the 37 players even got in.”


Another year, another no-go for some of baseball’s biggest stars of the steroid era. Roger Clemens and Barry Bonds are still shy of the necessary 75 to get in. And Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa’s recent percentages don’t look promising for any future in the Hall of Fame. And ESPN’s Tony Kornheiser says their absence is a shame.

“And someday maybe there will be a revision of theory on this. But if you look at the voters now, they didn’t just say thumbs down, they said get out! Get out! And I can’t imagine the Hall of Fame without these guys.”

MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough says keep ‘em out of Cooperstown.

“I don’t want Barry Bonds, that felon, that creep to be in the same state with Hank Aaron.”

It wasn’t just the biggest names of the steroid era denied entry. Player Craig Biggio came closest but was 39 votes shy. Tigers great Jack Morris was a close second but only has one more year left of eligibility. And Mike Piazza -- the greatest hitting catcher in history -- only received 57% of the vote.

The snub of those players suggests voters won’t accept anyone with even a whisper of steroid use. And a writer for WTVJ calls that an unfair standard.

“And if it continues to be applied haphazardly, it will permanently stain something that’s supposed to be a celebration of baseball.”

According to the New York Times, this marks the first time since 1960 that the induction ceremony won’t include any new, living honorees. And former player Pete Rose says that could have a negative economic impact.

“We have a lot of friends in Cooperstown who own stores and they kind of thrive on that week, Hall of Fame week, to survive for the year. I don’t know what kind of induction week it’s going to be now because there’s no induction.”

Voters take into consideration a candidate’s integrity, sportsmanship, character, and playing record.

 

 

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