(Thumbnail Image: Newsy)

 

Barbie’s got a new job.

After more than 500,000 votes in an online contest, fans have selected two new careers for the world’s most widely recognized doll—news anchor and computer engineer.


“Who says this is a jobless recovery? Barbie fans have just voted her two new jobs to add to her résumé. One of them: computer engineer. The other: news anchor. Yeah right, like a TV news anchor is gong to look like that. Hey, wait a minute, maybe this isn’t so far fetched…” (MSNBC)

 

In the words of Investment U.com:

 

“Barbie is back.”

In the first several weeks of 2010, Barbie has helped send Mattel’s stock up more than five percent.


On FOX Business, Mattel’s Vice President discusses the significance of Barbie as a computer engineer.
 
“Computer engineer was something that was really intriguing to us. We were seeing a lot of computer engineers sort of banding together and really wanting to get the word out. It’s a career that women are very under-represented in, and I think they had a lot of passion for getting their career and women in technology out in the market place.”


But in an article from Wired, the author says computer engineer Barbie could be more realistic.

He says the doll should have…

“A switch to turn on dark circles under Barbie’s eyes from having worked until 2 a.m. three days in a row… (And) “A wrist brace for when Barbie gets carpal tunnel syndrome.”


CNBC Europe offers a broader perspective – examining the international toy industry as a whole.

While at the world’s biggest toy fair in Nuremberg, Germany, Mattel International’s president tells CNBC Europe why he is optimistic about the international toy industry, even in a tough economy.

“We have seen toy category growth virtually across almost every country in the world. So the toy category has been very robust. It’s interesting that the toy industry is not immune to recessions or great growth spurts, but it seems to move along pretty well. Kids are really the last people in the family to be impacted by any kind of economic issue and this last year was no exception. We are very optimistic about the toy category for 2010.”

So, do you think Mattel depicted Barbie as a news anchor and computer engineer accurately?

 

Writer: Kyrsten Skulborstad
Producer: Newsy Staff

Barbie's New Look

by Charlie McKeague
0
Transcript
Feb 17, 2010

Barbie's New Look

(Thumbnail Image: Newsy)

 

Barbie’s got a new job.

After more than 500,000 votes in an online contest, fans have selected two new careers for the world’s most widely recognized doll—news anchor and computer engineer.


“Who says this is a jobless recovery? Barbie fans have just voted her two new jobs to add to her résumé. One of them: computer engineer. The other: news anchor. Yeah right, like a TV news anchor is gong to look like that. Hey, wait a minute, maybe this isn’t so far fetched…” (MSNBC)

 

In the words of Investment U.com:

 

“Barbie is back.”

In the first several weeks of 2010, Barbie has helped send Mattel’s stock up more than five percent.


On FOX Business, Mattel’s Vice President discusses the significance of Barbie as a computer engineer.
 
“Computer engineer was something that was really intriguing to us. We were seeing a lot of computer engineers sort of banding together and really wanting to get the word out. It’s a career that women are very under-represented in, and I think they had a lot of passion for getting their career and women in technology out in the market place.”


But in an article from Wired, the author says computer engineer Barbie could be more realistic.

He says the doll should have…

“A switch to turn on dark circles under Barbie’s eyes from having worked until 2 a.m. three days in a row… (And) “A wrist brace for when Barbie gets carpal tunnel syndrome.”


CNBC Europe offers a broader perspective – examining the international toy industry as a whole.

While at the world’s biggest toy fair in Nuremberg, Germany, Mattel International’s president tells CNBC Europe why he is optimistic about the international toy industry, even in a tough economy.

“We have seen toy category growth virtually across almost every country in the world. So the toy category has been very robust. It’s interesting that the toy industry is not immune to recessions or great growth spurts, but it seems to move along pretty well. Kids are really the last people in the family to be impacted by any kind of economic issue and this last year was no exception. We are very optimistic about the toy category for 2010.”

So, do you think Mattel depicted Barbie as a news anchor and computer engineer accurately?

 

Writer: Kyrsten Skulborstad
Producer: Newsy Staff

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