(Image source: Flickr)

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS

 

It’s a natural disaster on the highest battleground in the world. An estimated 15,000 Pakistani and Indian soldiers reside on the Siachen glacier in the border region of Kashmir. Al Jazeera reports more than 100 Pakistani troops found themselves trapped on that glacier Saturday.

 

“Pakistani soldiers are digging into an avalanche that buried at least 117 troops in the Himalayas. The rescue operation is underway on the Siachen glacier — that in the disputed Kashmir region.”

 

The CBC says — as of Saturday evening in Kashmir — no soldiers have been found alive, but a few casualties have been reported.

 

“The soldiers were stationed at a camp near the glacier where the avalanche hit. So far, at least a dozen bodies have been recovered. The high elevation and harsh weather conditions are making recovery operations difficult and dangerous.”

 

And with rescue efforts underway, BBC World News spoke with Major-General Athar Abbas, a spokesman for the Pakistani military. Abbas says, even by Himalayan standards, this is a big avalanche.

 

“But it’s a very massive level slide. It’s an avalanche of a dimension of 1,000 meters by 1,000 meters. And it is about 70 to 80 feet thick.”

 

Just how high are the troops trapped? Sky News gives us a glimpse.

 

“At an altitude of around 6,000 meters, 20,000 feet, that in itself posing something of a challenge for rescue parties who are on their way today.”

 

Speaking to CNN, General Abbas says communications with the troops buried under the avalanche have been completely severed.

 

“We haven’t been able to establish contact with anyone inside, but we are trying from various areas to approach the exact location … So, we are keeping our fingers crossed on that.”

 

Al Jazeera reports temperatures in Kashmir drop as low as negative 94 degrees Fahrenheit at night. Although the region is hotly contested by Pakistan and India, in the last 18 years, more soldiers at the buried base have died from weather-related incidents than from gunfire.

Avalanche Traps More Than 100 Pakistani Soldiers

by Zach Toombs
0
Transcript
Apr 7, 2012

Avalanche Traps More Than 100 Pakistani Soldiers

(Image source: Flickr)

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS

 

It’s a natural disaster on the highest battleground in the world. An estimated 15,000 Pakistani and Indian soldiers reside on the Siachen glacier in the border region of Kashmir. Al Jazeera reports more than 100 Pakistani troops found themselves trapped on that glacier Saturday.

 

“Pakistani soldiers are digging into an avalanche that buried at least 117 troops in the Himalayas. The rescue operation is underway on the Siachen glacier — that in the disputed Kashmir region.”

 

The CBC says — as of Saturday evening in Kashmir — no soldiers have been found alive, but a few casualties have been reported.

 

“The soldiers were stationed at a camp near the glacier where the avalanche hit. So far, at least a dozen bodies have been recovered. The high elevation and harsh weather conditions are making recovery operations difficult and dangerous.”

 

And with rescue efforts underway, BBC World News spoke with Major-General Athar Abbas, a spokesman for the Pakistani military. Abbas says, even by Himalayan standards, this is a big avalanche.

 

“But it’s a very massive level slide. It’s an avalanche of a dimension of 1,000 meters by 1,000 meters. And it is about 70 to 80 feet thick.”

 

Just how high are the troops trapped? Sky News gives us a glimpse.

 

“At an altitude of around 6,000 meters, 20,000 feet, that in itself posing something of a challenge for rescue parties who are on their way today.”

 

Speaking to CNN, General Abbas says communications with the troops buried under the avalanche have been completely severed.

 

“We haven’t been able to establish contact with anyone inside, but we are trying from various areas to approach the exact location … So, we are keeping our fingers crossed on that.”

 

Al Jazeera reports temperatures in Kashmir drop as low as negative 94 degrees Fahrenheit at night. Although the region is hotly contested by Pakistan and India, in the last 18 years, more soldiers at the buried base have died from weather-related incidents than from gunfire.

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