(Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

 

BY VICTORIA CRAIG

 

U.S. authorities say they thwarted a planned terrorist attack aboard a plane headed for the U.S. from Yemen Monday. CBS “This Morning” has the details of the developing story.

 

“The plot targeted planes bound for the United States using the latest version of the underwear bomb.”

 

CIA officials say no planes were ever in any danger. Al Jazeera reports, the device used in Monday’s failed attack was similar to the one used during the failed Christmas Day attack in 2009.

 

“That plot, too, involved a so-called underwear bomb. This latest device seems more sophisticated than the one worn in 2009...Officials say the would-be-bomber was stopped before he could select a target, or purchase a plane ticket.”

 

But there is a major difference between this attempted attack and the one three years ago. “Fox and Friends” explains the materials used to create this bomb were more subtle.

 

“It has no metal in it. So the metal detectors at the airport aren’t going to detect it. And apparently it’s got a new and improved detonator which is not good.”

 

Had the attack not been stopped, U.S. counterterrorism officials say the bomb was viable, though there were flaws that would have impacted the ability for it to detonate properly. The Wall Street Journal has more.

 

“The Federal Bureau of Investigation now has the bomb and is analyzing its makeup. The agency hopes to better understand tactics being employed by the al Qaeda affiliate that U.S. officials say poses the greatest danger to the U.S..”

 

An analyst for the BBC explains why the threat from the AQAP – or Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula – where Monday’s attack originated, concerns the White House the most.

 

“I think it’s a sign that the threat from Al Qaeda in Yemen remains strong...particularly because they have an expert bomb maker Ibrahim Hassan Al Asiri, who was involved in that first attack in 2009 and developed the underwear bomb.”

 

A correspondent for CNN outlines the most likely response from U.S. officials going forward.

 

“We should expect to see more drone strikes, more operations against this Al Qaeda organization. The critical thing right now is to make sure there are no more devices out there.”

 

The Wall Street Journal reports U.S. officials have known about the attack since April when they briefed President Obama. They also asked the Associated Press not to publish a report about it as early as last week because the intelligence operation was underway.

Authorities Stop Terrorist Attack on U.S.-Bound Plane

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May 8, 2012

Authorities Stop Terrorist Attack on U.S.-Bound Plane

(Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

 

BY VICTORIA CRAIG

 

U.S. authorities say they thwarted a planned terrorist attack aboard a plane headed for the U.S. from Yemen Monday. CBS “This Morning” has the details of the developing story.

 

“The plot targeted planes bound for the United States using the latest version of the underwear bomb.”

 

CIA officials say no planes were ever in any danger. Al Jazeera reports, the device used in Monday’s failed attack was similar to the one used during the failed Christmas Day attack in 2009.

 

“That plot, too, involved a so-called underwear bomb. This latest device seems more sophisticated than the one worn in 2009...Officials say the would-be-bomber was stopped before he could select a target, or purchase a plane ticket.”

 

But there is a major difference between this attempted attack and the one three years ago. “Fox and Friends” explains the materials used to create this bomb were more subtle.

 

“It has no metal in it. So the metal detectors at the airport aren’t going to detect it. And apparently it’s got a new and improved detonator which is not good.”

 

Had the attack not been stopped, U.S. counterterrorism officials say the bomb was viable, though there were flaws that would have impacted the ability for it to detonate properly. The Wall Street Journal has more.

 

“The Federal Bureau of Investigation now has the bomb and is analyzing its makeup. The agency hopes to better understand tactics being employed by the al Qaeda affiliate that U.S. officials say poses the greatest danger to the U.S..”

 

An analyst for the BBC explains why the threat from the AQAP – or Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula – where Monday’s attack originated, concerns the White House the most.

 

“I think it’s a sign that the threat from Al Qaeda in Yemen remains strong...particularly because they have an expert bomb maker Ibrahim Hassan Al Asiri, who was involved in that first attack in 2009 and developed the underwear bomb.”

 

A correspondent for CNN outlines the most likely response from U.S. officials going forward.

 

“We should expect to see more drone strikes, more operations against this Al Qaeda organization. The critical thing right now is to make sure there are no more devices out there.”

 

The Wall Street Journal reports U.S. officials have known about the attack since April when they briefed President Obama. They also asked the Associated Press not to publish a report about it as early as last week because the intelligence operation was underway.

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