(Image Source: U.S. Army)


BY CHARESSE JAMES


The U.S. Army has suspended its tuition assistance program as a result of another round of sequester defense cuts.

The halt went into effect Friday and applies to all soldiers, including those in the Army National Guard and Army Reserves. (Via NBC)

According to an Army spokesperson, it will not apply to those who are currently enrolled in classes, and soldiers who are in need of assistance will be able to get an education through their GI benefits. (Via U.S. Army)

"[The suspension] is necessary given the significant budget execution challenges caused by the combined effects of a possible year-long continuing resolution and sequestration … The Army understands the impacts of this action and will re-evaluate should the budgetary situation improve.”

The Army is facing a budget shortfall of more than $18 billion over the next seven months of the fiscal year. It’s due, in part, to large automatic defense cuts that took effect March 1 under so-called “sequestration.” (Via WTLV)

While Army officials suggest the program’s end is merely temporary, many are concerned it will affect future recruitment efforts. An unidentified Army recruiter told The Washington Times, tuition assistance is one of the main benefits they offer.

“Now, he worries that new privates he recently recruited will attempt to utilize the benefits, only to be told they are not offered anymore.”

With the $375 million in tuition assistance given in 2012, more than 2,800 soldiers earned associate degrees, nearly 4,500 earned their bachelor’s and almost 2,000 received graduate degrees. (Via Army)

And many soldiers still in their programs are angry — including one who told NBC:

“The only reason I joined the Army was because of tuition assistance, because it was paying for college. I would not have gotten the Associate’s degree I have now without it. … This is not just going to affect soldiers who take advantage of it, but the 3,100 colleges and universities that receive money from the program.”

The Marine Corps has already B a similar move, cutting their tuition assistance program in early March. The Navy and Air Force are expected to make their decisions within the next week.

Army Suspends Tuition Assistance Program

by Charesse James
1
Transcript
Mar 9, 2013

Army Suspends Tuition Assistance Program

(Image Source: U.S. Army)


BY CHARESSE JAMES


The U.S. Army has suspended its tuition assistance program as a result of another round of sequester defense cuts.

The halt went into effect Friday and applies to all soldiers, including those in the Army National Guard and Army Reserves. (Via NBC)

According to an Army spokesperson, it will not apply to those who are currently enrolled in classes, and soldiers who are in need of assistance will be able to get an education through their GI benefits. (Via U.S. Army)

"[The suspension] is necessary given the significant budget execution challenges caused by the combined effects of a possible year-long continuing resolution and sequestration … The Army understands the impacts of this action and will re-evaluate should the budgetary situation improve.”

The Army is facing a budget shortfall of more than $18 billion over the next seven months of the fiscal year. It’s due, in part, to large automatic defense cuts that took effect March 1 under so-called “sequestration.” (Via WTLV)

While Army officials suggest the program’s end is merely temporary, many are concerned it will affect future recruitment efforts. An unidentified Army recruiter told The Washington Times, tuition assistance is one of the main benefits they offer.

“Now, he worries that new privates he recently recruited will attempt to utilize the benefits, only to be told they are not offered anymore.”

With the $375 million in tuition assistance given in 2012, more than 2,800 soldiers earned associate degrees, nearly 4,500 earned their bachelor’s and almost 2,000 received graduate degrees. (Via Army)

And many soldiers still in their programs are angry — including one who told NBC:

“The only reason I joined the Army was because of tuition assistance, because it was paying for college. I would not have gotten the Associate’s degree I have now without it. … This is not just going to affect soldiers who take advantage of it, but the 3,100 colleges and universities that receive money from the program.”

The Marine Corps has already B a similar move, cutting their tuition assistance program in early March. The Navy and Air Force are expected to make their decisions within the next week.

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