Image: Coca-Cola Company



BY JASMINE BAILEY


Coca-Cola will speak out for the first time about a touchy subject for soda companies — obesity — in what the company is calling a quote “complex challenge.”


WRIC
“The soda giant will point out that obesity is the result of consuming too many calories of too many kind, not just soda.”


The ads will also mention that Coke has produced products with few calories over the years— like sports drinks, water and tea.


According to 24/7 Wall Street, the ads are aimed at deflecting some of the pressure from the soda industry, especially since it’s been threatened by caps on the size of drinks vendors will be allowed to sell.
 

“New York City is set the enforce a cap on the size of drinks for sale later this year, and as many as 20 cities and states have considered imposing taxes on sugared drinks… Coca-Cola [and other soda companies] have seen most of their growth in recent years from low-calorie drinks…Coke’s new ad campaign could just be acknowledging that fact.


The Los Angeles Times reports the campaign is called “Coming Together.” In it, Coke will…


“Showcase its efforts to be transparent about the nutritional content of its products while also expanding its lineup of better-for-you beverages with low or no calories.”


Coke will also launch another commercial during “American Idol” on Wednesday. That ad is called “Be OK,” in it the company plans to point out that burning off calories from Coke can be fun.


But not everyone wants to “Come Together” or believes consumers will “Be OK” when drinking Coke— especially the Center For Science In the Public Interest.


The company’s Executive Director called Coke’s campaign quote “a page out of damage control 101 saying Coke is trying to disarm the public."


And a video they released criticizing Coke’s trademark polar bear mascots has reached 2 million views.


Well, Coca-Cola’s new two-minute ads to defend against those types of claims will begin running Monday night on CNN, Fox News and MSNBC.









 

 

Are Coca-Cola's Obesity Ads A Step in the Right Direction?

by Jasmine Bailey
0
Transcript
Jan 14, 2013

Are Coca-Cola's Obesity Ads A Step in the Right Direction?

Image: Coca-Cola Company



BY JASMINE BAILEY


Coca-Cola will speak out for the first time about a touchy subject for soda companies — obesity — in what the company is calling a quote “complex challenge.”


WRIC
“The soda giant will point out that obesity is the result of consuming too many calories of too many kind, not just soda.”


The ads will also mention that Coke has produced products with few calories over the years— like sports drinks, water and tea.


According to 24/7 Wall Street, the ads are aimed at deflecting some of the pressure from the soda industry, especially since it’s been threatened by caps on the size of drinks vendors will be allowed to sell.
 

“New York City is set the enforce a cap on the size of drinks for sale later this year, and as many as 20 cities and states have considered imposing taxes on sugared drinks… Coca-Cola [and other soda companies] have seen most of their growth in recent years from low-calorie drinks…Coke’s new ad campaign could just be acknowledging that fact.


The Los Angeles Times reports the campaign is called “Coming Together.” In it, Coke will…


“Showcase its efforts to be transparent about the nutritional content of its products while also expanding its lineup of better-for-you beverages with low or no calories.”


Coke will also launch another commercial during “American Idol” on Wednesday. That ad is called “Be OK,” in it the company plans to point out that burning off calories from Coke can be fun.


But not everyone wants to “Come Together” or believes consumers will “Be OK” when drinking Coke— especially the Center For Science In the Public Interest.


The company’s Executive Director called Coke’s campaign quote “a page out of damage control 101 saying Coke is trying to disarm the public."


And a video they released criticizing Coke’s trademark polar bear mascots has reached 2 million views.


Well, Coca-Cola’s new two-minute ads to defend against those types of claims will begin running Monday night on CNN, Fox News and MSNBC.









 

 

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