(Image Source: Christian Science Monitor)

 

BY LOGAN TITTLE

 

The Department of Justice filed a lawsuit Wednesday against Apple and five other e-book publishers accused of conspiring to fix e-book prices.

 

And Apple isn’t backing down. Here’s CNBC:

 

“Apple is saying the allegations are not true. Three publishers have settled and…the Justice Department and Apple will battle it out in court.”

 

The suit stems from the 2010 release of the iPad and its iBookstore.  CNN Money reports-

 

“As a result, e-book customers have paid between $2 and $3 more per book, amounting to upwards of $100 million dollars more than they otherwise would have...”

 

But, in response to the conspiracy claims—Apple released a statement to All Things Digital saying the DOJ got it all wrong—Apple just wanted to level the playing field with Amazon by doing what they already do with music.

 

“The DOJ’s accusation of collusion against Apple is simply not true. The launch of the iBookstore in 2010 fostered innovation and competition, breaking Amazon’s monopolistic grip on the publishing industry. Since then customers have benefited from eBooks that are more interactive and engaging.”

 

So will Apple come out ahead of the Department of Justice? It’s possible- according to a professor at the University of Hartford . He told CBS News the department should be looking at the publishers, not Apple.

 

“One reason lies in the…36-page complaint, which recounts how publishers met over breakfast in a London hotel and dinners…The key point is that Apple wasn’t present.”

 

And what’s on the shelf for e-books? PBS reports the Justice Department thinks the lawsuit will make the marketplace more competitive—But Becky Anderson, President of the American Booksellers Association, says that was already the case.

 

“By creating the Agency Model…so many more people were able to be in the e-book business…the prices of many e-books went down…because they wanted to get the marketplace diverse, get many players into it.”

 

As for the price of e-books—the Chicago Daily Tribune says it’s too soon to tell what will happen as a result of this suit. Daily Tech says the only sure thing- is a long legal battle.

Apple Responds to E-Book Lawsuit

by Logan Tittle
0
Transcript
Apr 13, 2012

Apple Responds to E-Book Lawsuit

(Image Source: Christian Science Monitor)

 

BY LOGAN TITTLE

 

The Department of Justice filed a lawsuit Wednesday against Apple and five other e-book publishers accused of conspiring to fix e-book prices.

 

And Apple isn’t backing down. Here’s CNBC:

 

“Apple is saying the allegations are not true. Three publishers have settled and…the Justice Department and Apple will battle it out in court.”

 

The suit stems from the 2010 release of the iPad and its iBookstore.  CNN Money reports-

 

“As a result, e-book customers have paid between $2 and $3 more per book, amounting to upwards of $100 million dollars more than they otherwise would have...”

 

But, in response to the conspiracy claims—Apple released a statement to All Things Digital saying the DOJ got it all wrong—Apple just wanted to level the playing field with Amazon by doing what they already do with music.

 

“The DOJ’s accusation of collusion against Apple is simply not true. The launch of the iBookstore in 2010 fostered innovation and competition, breaking Amazon’s monopolistic grip on the publishing industry. Since then customers have benefited from eBooks that are more interactive and engaging.”

 

So will Apple come out ahead of the Department of Justice? It’s possible- according to a professor at the University of Hartford . He told CBS News the department should be looking at the publishers, not Apple.

 

“One reason lies in the…36-page complaint, which recounts how publishers met over breakfast in a London hotel and dinners…The key point is that Apple wasn’t present.”

 

And what’s on the shelf for e-books? PBS reports the Justice Department thinks the lawsuit will make the marketplace more competitive—But Becky Anderson, President of the American Booksellers Association, says that was already the case.

 

“By creating the Agency Model…so many more people were able to be in the e-book business…the prices of many e-books went down…because they wanted to get the marketplace diverse, get many players into it.”

 

As for the price of e-books—the Chicago Daily Tribune says it’s too soon to tell what will happen as a result of this suit. Daily Tech says the only sure thing- is a long legal battle.

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