(Image Souce: Flagerlive)

 

BY LUKAS UDSTUEN
ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS

 

At first they claimed a media blackout. But now -- Occupy Wall Street protesters are getting wall-to-wall press.

 

“It's day 24 of the Occupy Wall Street protest. The movement against corporate greed.” (CNN)

 

“Those Occupy Wall Street protests are gaining momentum.” (MSNBC)

 

“The Wall Street occupiers and their growing offshoots around the country seem defiantly unorganized...” (Fox News)

 

But in the early days of the movement, some of its supporters questioned the mainstream media’s coverage of the protests. Here’s Current TV’s Keith Olbermann.

 

"Protests called Occupy Wall Street trying to underscore and gum up the financial industry's influence on who's rich and who's not -- why wouldn't that get extensive news coverage?"

 

That was back on September 2st. But since the Occupy Wall Street movement has continued to grow, analysts have looked at the claims of what movement supporters have called a “media blackout.”

 

About a week ago The Christian Science Monitor published an article called “Occupy Wall Street: Why this revolution isn’t made for TV.”

 

The article suggests the movement’s complexity is what kept it off the air. A communications professor at La Salle University tells the Monitor...

 

“Part of its initial problem in gaining media coverage was its lack of a charismatic and quotable leader, which would allow news outlets to cover more than groups of (mostly) young people in centers of commerce.”

 

Coverage of the protest began to pick up during the first week, but Al Jazeera notes it wasn’t until the protesters clashed with police that the media even began to take notice.

 

“News organizations love to cover news. It's news when protesters get pepper sprayed, it's news when protesters get arrested. (Police swinging batons and using pepper spray to fight back the crowd) It's much harder to report on a massive nationwide debt problem.”

 

But it basically took the media three weeks of protests to really take notice. CNN’s Howard Kurtz asked Washington Post media critic Eric Wemple, what took so long?

 

Wemple says, a movement has to prove itself before the media will cover it.

 

“These protesters, happened to their credit, to be savvy on social networks. They're able to build their own protests. The media can come in. I don't see a huge problem the way Keith Olberman did and others did with the media blackout. I didn't see a huge problem with the protest, proves itself, generates headlines, doing thing that turns some heads. Then the media can jump in. I think that's the system working, not the system broken.”

 

On NPR-affiliate KBIA -- a panel of University of Missouri journalism professors offer other explanations for the slow-to-come-by media coverage.

 

LEE WILKINS: “One of the things we know academically is that the media are terrible about covering social movements (…)  I think it's too soon to know whether this is a ‘social movement’ in the sense of civil rights or women's rights — but it certainly has aspects like that to it.”

 

New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg says as long as they don’t break any laws, the protesters can stay as long as they want. 

 

Transcript by Newsy.

Analyzing Media Coverage of Occupy Wall Street

by Charlie McKeague
0
Transcript
Oct 11, 2011

Analyzing Media Coverage of Occupy Wall Street

(Image Souce: Flagerlive)

 

BY LUKAS UDSTUEN
ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS

 

At first they claimed a media blackout. But now -- Occupy Wall Street protesters are getting wall-to-wall press.

 

“It's day 24 of the Occupy Wall Street protest. The movement against corporate greed.” (CNN)

 

“Those Occupy Wall Street protests are gaining momentum.” (MSNBC)

 

“The Wall Street occupiers and their growing offshoots around the country seem defiantly unorganized...” (Fox News)

 

But in the early days of the movement, some of its supporters questioned the mainstream media’s coverage of the protests. Here’s Current TV’s Keith Olbermann.

 

"Protests called Occupy Wall Street trying to underscore and gum up the financial industry's influence on who's rich and who's not -- why wouldn't that get extensive news coverage?"

 

That was back on September 2st. But since the Occupy Wall Street movement has continued to grow, analysts have looked at the claims of what movement supporters have called a “media blackout.”

 

About a week ago The Christian Science Monitor published an article called “Occupy Wall Street: Why this revolution isn’t made for TV.”

 

The article suggests the movement’s complexity is what kept it off the air. A communications professor at La Salle University tells the Monitor...

 

“Part of its initial problem in gaining media coverage was its lack of a charismatic and quotable leader, which would allow news outlets to cover more than groups of (mostly) young people in centers of commerce.”

 

Coverage of the protest began to pick up during the first week, but Al Jazeera notes it wasn’t until the protesters clashed with police that the media even began to take notice.

 

“News organizations love to cover news. It's news when protesters get pepper sprayed, it's news when protesters get arrested. (Police swinging batons and using pepper spray to fight back the crowd) It's much harder to report on a massive nationwide debt problem.”

 

But it basically took the media three weeks of protests to really take notice. CNN’s Howard Kurtz asked Washington Post media critic Eric Wemple, what took so long?

 

Wemple says, a movement has to prove itself before the media will cover it.

 

“These protesters, happened to their credit, to be savvy on social networks. They're able to build their own protests. The media can come in. I don't see a huge problem the way Keith Olberman did and others did with the media blackout. I didn't see a huge problem with the protest, proves itself, generates headlines, doing thing that turns some heads. Then the media can jump in. I think that's the system working, not the system broken.”

 

On NPR-affiliate KBIA -- a panel of University of Missouri journalism professors offer other explanations for the slow-to-come-by media coverage.

 

LEE WILKINS: “One of the things we know academically is that the media are terrible about covering social movements (…)  I think it's too soon to know whether this is a ‘social movement’ in the sense of civil rights or women's rights — but it certainly has aspects like that to it.”

 

New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg says as long as they don’t break any laws, the protesters can stay as long as they want. 

 

Transcript by Newsy.

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