(Image source: I Am Amsterdam)

 

BY TRACY PFEIFFER

ANCHOR AUSTIN KIM


You're watching multisource world news analysis from Newsy.

 


It’s been called the Marijuana Mecca.
Amsterdam’s lenient enforcement of marijuana laws is well-known around the world.
But if quote-”far-right” political leaders have their way -- the world may soon be cut off. The Atlantic reports.

“Amsterdam has long been a destination for tourists looking for a fix. Unlike in most countries where the sale of cannabis is illegal, the Dutch are famous for allowing the drug to be sold in their coffee shops. Yet, in an effort to decrease drug tourism, the Dutch government announced Friday that it will be restricting the sale to citizens.”

The policy switch would turn cannabis cafes -- into exclusive clubs.
Residents can apply to join on a one-year contract  -- but each coffee shop will have a membership cap.
The head of the largest Dutch tour operator says -- it’ll be money out the window.

"The coffee shops belong to our culture... That will really hit the city bad. Also many young foreigners after their first visit will not return at an older age when they have more money.” (Dutch Daily News)

A writer for Gawker admits he doesn’t like the policy overall -- but understands it, at least.

“...we don't really blame the Dutch for wanting to limit drug tourism, given that it attracts the most annoying people on the planet. But it does pose a problem for those selfsame people: Rising college seniors in America, who, when they visit Amsterdam on their big post-college eurotrip next year, will be limited to actual sight-seeing, and, like art and stuff. ...How horrible!”

And from “annoying people” to “dangerous people” -- a writer for Politonomist argues, the move will stir up problems seen in other countries with strict marijuana prohibition laws.

“It will more than likely increase the size of the black market for marijuana in the country, jeopardizing the safety of tourists and residents alike. In trying to curb petty disturbances associated with narco-tourism the Dutch government may have created a bigger problem.”
 

 

 

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Amsterdam to Ban Tourists from 'Cannabis Cafes'

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May 31, 2011

Amsterdam to Ban Tourists from 'Cannabis Cafes'

(Image source: I Am Amsterdam)

 

BY TRACY PFEIFFER

ANCHOR AUSTIN KIM


You're watching multisource world news analysis from Newsy.

 


It’s been called the Marijuana Mecca.
Amsterdam’s lenient enforcement of marijuana laws is well-known around the world.
But if quote-”far-right” political leaders have their way -- the world may soon be cut off. The Atlantic reports.

“Amsterdam has long been a destination for tourists looking for a fix. Unlike in most countries where the sale of cannabis is illegal, the Dutch are famous for allowing the drug to be sold in their coffee shops. Yet, in an effort to decrease drug tourism, the Dutch government announced Friday that it will be restricting the sale to citizens.”

The policy switch would turn cannabis cafes -- into exclusive clubs.
Residents can apply to join on a one-year contract  -- but each coffee shop will have a membership cap.
The head of the largest Dutch tour operator says -- it’ll be money out the window.

"The coffee shops belong to our culture... That will really hit the city bad. Also many young foreigners after their first visit will not return at an older age when they have more money.” (Dutch Daily News)

A writer for Gawker admits he doesn’t like the policy overall -- but understands it, at least.

“...we don't really blame the Dutch for wanting to limit drug tourism, given that it attracts the most annoying people on the planet. But it does pose a problem for those selfsame people: Rising college seniors in America, who, when they visit Amsterdam on their big post-college eurotrip next year, will be limited to actual sight-seeing, and, like art and stuff. ...How horrible!”

And from “annoying people” to “dangerous people” -- a writer for Politonomist argues, the move will stir up problems seen in other countries with strict marijuana prohibition laws.

“It will more than likely increase the size of the black market for marijuana in the country, jeopardizing the safety of tourists and residents alike. In trying to curb petty disturbances associated with narco-tourism the Dutch government may have created a bigger problem.”
 

 

 

Follow @Newsy_Videos on Twitter

Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy

Transcript by Newsy

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