(Image Source: The Atlantic)

 

BY EMOKE BEBIAK

You're watching multisource world video news analysis from Newsy.

 

Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi went on state television on Tuesday to announce he has no intention to of resigning. Even more, he would rather die as a martyr.

 

Gaddafi: "I am paying the price of staying here. My grandfather is Abdessalam Bouminyar, the first martyr in Khoms, in the first battle of 1911. I cannot bring shame to this great ancestry. I cannot leave my grandfather's grave in Marghab. I shall die as a martyr beside him in the end."

 

Gaddafi’s speech came after days of riots in Libya -- leaving hundreds dead. CNN reports Libyan state television showed positive reactions to the speech.

 

“Now after Gaddafi’s speech today we saw these scenes, take a look. These are the scenes playing out on Libyan state television: crowds of people shouting, chanting in support of their leader, waving green flags.”

 

But many in the Western media predict the end of Gaddafi’s regime is near. The New York Daily News’ Helen Kennedy draws a parallel between Libya and Egypt.

 

“His 42-year-old regime was teetering near collapse, and his hour-long rant was a less coherent version of the final desperate speech Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak made the day before he was toppled.”

 

But while the Libyan situation might resemble that of Egypt and Tunisia, The Atlantic is skeptical the outcome will be the same.

 

“It's clear that Qaddafi is unwilling -- and, at this point, probably unable -- to follow the examples of Egypt and Tunisia, where Presidents Mubarak and Ben Ali quietly stepped down after failing to restore order to the capital.”

 

Christian Science Monitor reports the main issue is not whether Gaddafi is willing to surrender power. The root of the issue is his view on power.

 

“The problem is that Mr. Qaddafi – thanks to the whimsical system of governance he's given Libya – rejects the proposition that he has any power to concede."

 

Finally -- a BBC analysts says his regime is certainly shaken, but collapsing completely is no sure thing.


“It’s too soon to write him off completely. I know lots of defecting Libyan diplomats are saying it’s the end of his regime. Not quite. Remember how wrong we all were about Saddam Hussein in March 1991 ... I think that he is mortally wounded, his regime is mortally wounded, but it’s still twitching.”

 

In his speech, Gaddafi called the rioters “rats” and “cockroaches,” claiming they were drugged to create public disturbance.
 

'Like Newsy' on Facebook to receive daily updates. 

 

Get more multisource world video news analysis from Newsy.

 

Transcript by Newsy.

Amid Unrest, Gaddafi Vows Death Before Resignation

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Transcript
Feb 22, 2011

Amid Unrest, Gaddafi Vows Death Before Resignation

(Image Source: The Atlantic)

 

BY EMOKE BEBIAK

You're watching multisource world video news analysis from Newsy.

 

Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi went on state television on Tuesday to announce he has no intention to of resigning. Even more, he would rather die as a martyr.

 

Gaddafi: "I am paying the price of staying here. My grandfather is Abdessalam Bouminyar, the first martyr in Khoms, in the first battle of 1911. I cannot bring shame to this great ancestry. I cannot leave my grandfather's grave in Marghab. I shall die as a martyr beside him in the end."

 

Gaddafi’s speech came after days of riots in Libya -- leaving hundreds dead. CNN reports Libyan state television showed positive reactions to the speech.

 

“Now after Gaddafi’s speech today we saw these scenes, take a look. These are the scenes playing out on Libyan state television: crowds of people shouting, chanting in support of their leader, waving green flags.”

 

But many in the Western media predict the end of Gaddafi’s regime is near. The New York Daily News’ Helen Kennedy draws a parallel between Libya and Egypt.

 

“His 42-year-old regime was teetering near collapse, and his hour-long rant was a less coherent version of the final desperate speech Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak made the day before he was toppled.”

 

But while the Libyan situation might resemble that of Egypt and Tunisia, The Atlantic is skeptical the outcome will be the same.

 

“It's clear that Qaddafi is unwilling -- and, at this point, probably unable -- to follow the examples of Egypt and Tunisia, where Presidents Mubarak and Ben Ali quietly stepped down after failing to restore order to the capital.”

 

Christian Science Monitor reports the main issue is not whether Gaddafi is willing to surrender power. The root of the issue is his view on power.

 

“The problem is that Mr. Qaddafi – thanks to the whimsical system of governance he's given Libya – rejects the proposition that he has any power to concede."

 

Finally -- a BBC analysts says his regime is certainly shaken, but collapsing completely is no sure thing.


“It’s too soon to write him off completely. I know lots of defecting Libyan diplomats are saying it’s the end of his regime. Not quite. Remember how wrong we all were about Saddam Hussein in March 1991 ... I think that he is mortally wounded, his regime is mortally wounded, but it’s still twitching.”

 

In his speech, Gaddafi called the rioters “rats” and “cockroaches,” claiming they were drugged to create public disturbance.
 

'Like Newsy' on Facebook to receive daily updates. 

 

Get more multisource world video news analysis from Newsy.

 

Transcript by Newsy.

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