(Image Source: Detroit Free Press)

 

BY HARUMENDHAH HELMY

ANCHOR BRICE SANDER


Amid union protests outside the chambers, Michigan’s House of Representatives voted to pass right-to-work legislation. If signed into law, the bill would make paying union dues optional.
 

Just hours before the bill went to the floor, Gov. Rick Snyder, Lt. Gov. Brian Calley and the state’s GOP lawmakers voiced their support. Their statements brought union protesters to the capital. (Video: The Detroit News)
 

And it got ugly. At one point, officers pepper-sprayed and arrested eight protesters who police say tried to rush the Senate floor. The capital was briefly put on lockdown. (Video: The Detroit Free Press)
 

The House’s vote brings Michigan closer to being the 24th right-to-work state in the country. According to WLNS, Gov. Snyder has ignored the topic for three years.
 

“The governor concluded this issue would not go away, so why not confront it? So he did.”
SNYDER: “This is all about taking care of the hard-working workers of Michigan. About being pro-worker. About giving them the freedom to choose who they associate with.”
 

But, speaking to WXYZ, United Auto Workers President Bob King says the bill isn’t looking out for workers’ welfare at all.
 

“The data and the facts from all the right-to-work states show that it’s a right to work for less. They wanna push workers wages and benefits down.”
 

Supporters of the right-to-work bill also say it would attract more investments to the state. But the Detroit Free Press talked to some economists who say otherwise.
 

One Michigan State University professor said the bill would only have minimal impact on Michigan’s economy. But because the state is the birthplace of United Auto Workers, union rights are a touchy issue. “It’s an awful lot of political blood to be spilled for something that will not galvanize Michigan’s economy.”
 

The bill now heads to the Senate, which like the House, has a GOP majority. According to the Lansing State Journal, about 17 percent of Michigan's workforce is affiliated with a union.

 

 

 

Amid Protests, Michigan House Passes Right-to-Work Law

by
0
Transcript
Dec 6, 2012

Amid Protests, Michigan House Passes Right-to-Work Law

 

(Image Source: Detroit Free Press)

 

BY HARUMENDHAH HELMY

ANCHOR BRICE SANDER


Amid union protests outside the chambers, Michigan’s House of Representatives voted to pass right-to-work legislation. If signed into law, the bill would make paying union dues optional.
 

Just hours before the bill went to the floor, Gov. Rick Snyder, Lt. Gov. Brian Calley and the state’s GOP lawmakers voiced their support. Their statements brought union protesters to the capital. (Video: The Detroit News)
 

And it got ugly. At one point, officers pepper-sprayed and arrested eight protesters who police say tried to rush the Senate floor. The capital was briefly put on lockdown. (Video: The Detroit Free Press)
 

The House’s vote brings Michigan closer to being the 24th right-to-work state in the country. According to WLNS, Gov. Snyder has ignored the topic for three years.
 

“The governor concluded this issue would not go away, so why not confront it? So he did.”
SNYDER: “This is all about taking care of the hard-working workers of Michigan. About being pro-worker. About giving them the freedom to choose who they associate with.”
 

But, speaking to WXYZ, United Auto Workers President Bob King says the bill isn’t looking out for workers’ welfare at all.
 

“The data and the facts from all the right-to-work states show that it’s a right to work for less. They wanna push workers wages and benefits down.”
 

Supporters of the right-to-work bill also say it would attract more investments to the state. But the Detroit Free Press talked to some economists who say otherwise.
 

One Michigan State University professor said the bill would only have minimal impact on Michigan’s economy. But because the state is the birthplace of United Auto Workers, union rights are a touchy issue. “It’s an awful lot of political blood to be spilled for something that will not galvanize Michigan’s economy.”
 

The bill now heads to the Senate, which like the House, has a GOP majority. According to the Lansing State Journal, about 17 percent of Michigan's workforce is affiliated with a union.

 

 

 

View More
Comments
Newsy
www3